American Airlines pilots get iPads for flight manuals

Msprissypants

Mors tua, vita mea
Short Bussed
American Airlines is continuing its efforts to modernise airspace by expanding its iPad Electronic Flight Bag programme. This follows the carrier becoming the first in the commercial sector to receive approval from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to use the mobile device in cockpits throughout every stage of flights.
Pilots working for American Airlines will now get to use iPads, which are the only tablet approved by the FAA to be an Electronic Flight Bags on certain planes. The device replaces the paper reference manuals and other material that are usually found in the carry-on kitbag that pilots take on flights. This means each aircraft will be 35lbs. lighter, which is estimated to save $1.2 million in fuel every year based on the current price of fuel.
American Airlines was first approved to use the iPad in the cockpit last year, which came several months after the carrier completed testing with pilots using the devices in the cockpit. This is also the first device to be approved by the FAA, and the regulator could approve other tablets for use.
The carrier’s pilots will begin using the iPad on its Boeing 777 fleet this month. The staff will be given an iPad to use in training and during flights. American Airlines’ goal is to have approval from the FAA for the device to be used in all aircraft by the end of the year. The airline will then discontinue the distribution of paper revisions to its manuals and a majority of navigation charts by the start of next year.
As part of the Electronic Flight Bag scheme, American Airlines pilots will use mobile data and software from Jeppesen, which is a Boeing Flight Services unit. The application has been approved by the FAA and is allowed for gate-to-gate use during all flight phases. It will replace the large paper operating manuals with up-to-date electronic information, which will be delivered in real-time and be easier to access.
American Airlines chief information officer Maya Leibman said that they are focused on building a new company where innovation and technology are fundamental to its return to leading the industry and delivering exceptional customer service. The Electronic Flight Bag scheme is another example of the progress they are making to provide their staff with the tools they need to deliver a leading customer experience and improvements to operations.
In fact, Leibman added, their cabin crew have been testing a programme on handheld tablets. This will give them better information about the passengers on their flights, as well as the customer’s needs. They will have more to share on this and other technologies in the coming weeks and months.
American Airlines vice president of flight Captain John Hale says that this is a very important and thrilling milestone for everyone at the company as they work to modernise their processes and meet the needs of their people as best as possible. With the FAA’s approval, they will be able to use the iPad to fully realise the benefits of the Electronic Flight Bag programme. This includes reducing their dependency on paper products, increasing the fuel efficiency of their planes, and improving their pilots’ work environment. They are giving their people equipment to provide the best resources, allowing for more efficient flying.
Jeppesen senior vice president and general manager of aviation Thomas Wede says their mobile solutions will deliver industry-leading flight information via thousands of iPads, which will be integrated into American Airlines’ operations. They fully support the airline in this process, and their mobile data software solution will reduce operating costs, improve situational awareness and increase efficiency.

....yeah, I am sticking to paper. I'd rather not be asking whether there is an app for this or that while plunging 18,000ft a minute. As someone who is currently in flight school, I have used a kindlefire and that has been a total nightmare. It takes your eyes off essential equipment or when you should be looking for traffic around you.
Certainly will be interesting to see how many accidents are caused because of retarded shit like a bad cell in a battery of an Ipad..
 

mrln

silent ghost
it wouldnt be easier useing an ipad then riffleing through some papers as the plane looses control youd know of an app anyway right?
 
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Msprissypants

Msprissypants

Mors tua, vita mea
Short Bussed
it wouldnt be easier useing an ipad then riffleing through some papers as the plane looses control youd know of an app anyway right?
If its man made, it will fail - at some point. Murphys law, and believe me things snowball fast in the front seat.
 

mrln

silent ghost
If its man made, it will fail - at some point. Murphys law, and believe me things snowball fast in the front seat.
im sure they do. thats my point though. if shit hits the fan quick,wouldnt it be quicker tapping a screen than rifleing through a book? i understand the "man made" theory,but....
 

Zayad

groovy chicken
I have used a kindlefire and that has been a total nightmare. It takes your eyes off essential equipment or when you should be looking for traffic around you.
Because thumbing through a book doesn't do the exact same?
 

Zayad

groovy chicken
It's a checklist a few key words, not full paragraph pages in a book. :unreal:
Wouldn't it still be easier to just hold an ipad or something? I dunno I'm not trying to come off as a dick it just seems like it would be easier :\ you have to take your eyes off controls either way is what I was saying.
 
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Msprissypants

Msprissypants

Mors tua, vita mea
Short Bussed
Actually, you don't. It's called a Heads Up Display. very common these days in commercial aircraft
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