American ISPs to launch massive copyright spying scheme on July 12

If you download potentially copyrighted software, videos or music, your Internet service provider (ISP) has been watching, and they’re coming for you.

Specifically, they’re coming for you on Thursday, July 12.

That’s the date when the nation’s largest ISPs will all voluntarily implement a new anti-piracy plan that will engage network operators in the largest digital spying scheme in history, and see some users’ bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/03/...h-massive-copyright-spying-scheme-on-july-12/
 

Decent60

Patient goes beep beep beeeeeeeeeep
This will make Tor alot more popular :)
Err, exclude that first part of my original post, thought you wrote torrent lol. Though, I am curious how they will be able to tell the difference between the cache download and the actual download or view of picture and some music.
 

D.O.A.

These are great days we're living, bros
Err, exclude that first part of my original post, thought you wrote torrent lol. Though, I am curious how they will be able to tell the difference between the cache download and the actual download or view of picture and some music.
they can snoop any unencrypted packets being sent, and also fuck you by IP addy if legal cunts seed something, then record the IP downloading it. I don't know if your IP is enough to come search your house tho, but i wouldn't be surprised if it is. All traffic needs to be encrypted for them to be left guessing. tor is cool but slow as fuck, it wasn't designed for downloads.
 

Decent60

Patient goes beep beep beeeeeeeeeep
they can snoop any unencrypted packets being sent, and also fuck you by IP addy if legal cunts seed something, then record the IP downloading it. I don't know if your IP is enough to come search your house tho, but i wouldn't be surprised if it is. All traffic needs to be encrypted for them to be left guessing. tor is cool but slow as fuck, it wasn't designed for downloads.
Are you talking about torrent downloads or just straight up regular downloads?
As far as I know, they'll be able to see the request for data regardless on the regular downloads (though, that's when you use "HTTPS Everywhere" to get encrypted) but my question was how can they determine from cache download (what your browser does automatically) and your 'save as' download on their end. I know if you owned the webserver that would be easy as fuck to tell but not if you were just the middle-man.
 

Dr. Acid Avatar

★★★ПСИХ★★★
Just wait come July 12th. I may be wrong but the internet traffic will be not be what ISPs expected. What? Their profits go down as the numbers of internet surfers shrink.
 

D.O.A.

These are great days we're living, bros
Are you talking about torrent downloads or just straight up regular downloads?
As far as I know, they'll be able to see the request for data regardless on the regular downloads (though, that's when you use "HTTPS Everywhere" to get encrypted) but my question was how can they determine from cache download (what your browser does automatically) and your 'save as' download on their end. I know if you owned the webserver that would be easy as fuck to tell but not if you were just the middle-man.
Well from what I understand there is the ability to detect what you use, as in isp will throttle you for using limewire or utorrent based on its signature. Regardless of being a linux ISO or game ISO you'll be pegged as a Torrent user. This is the tech that will bring on two tier internet. I'll find the article when I get home... Anyway if its encrypted downloads they can't tell, but only a court order prevents ISPs putting a box between you and them and capturing every byte you send/recieve, so if its cached or not I fail to see any difference if they are grabbing everything.

sent from a tin can & string using Tapatalk
 

Decent60

Patient goes beep beep beeeeeeeeeep
Well from what I understand there is the ability to detect what you use, as in isp will throttle you for using limewire or utorrent based on its signature. Regardless of being a linux ISO or game ISO you'll be pegged as a Torrent user. This is the tech that will bring on two tier internet. I'll find the article when I get home... Anyway if its encrypted downloads they can't tell, but only a court order prevents ISPs putting a box between you and them and capturing every byte you send/recieve, so if its cached or not I fail to see any difference if they are grabbing everything.

sent from a tin can & string using Tapatalk
Oh yes. LimeWire, Torrent and many other P2P networks use specific ports to connect (changing the port in Torrents only does minor effect in masking them). Thus tracking them is actually a breeze. What I was curious about was about the Pictures, since 99% of everyone on the internet has at least 1 copyrighted picture on their computer that they just used a simple web browser to download from.
I doubt they can totally track that since it's impossible to do unless they know the exact destination of the data.
 

D.O.A.

These are great days we're living, bros
We have a government here hell bent on implementing mandatory data retention at ISP level (up to one year), also a firewall for banning websites that will rival china, so you can imagine the drama it caused on aussie tech gossip forums & print rags. Most of the hate is saved for this dpi stuff

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_packet_inspection#Background

A classified packet can be redirected, marked/tagged (see quality of service), blocked, rate limited, and of course reported to a reporting agent in the network.
The National Security Agency (NSA), with cooperation from AT&T has used Deep Packet Inspection technology to make internet traffic surveillance, sorting and forwarding more intelligent. The DPI is used to find which packets are carrying e-mail or a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone call.[19] Traffic associated with AT&T’s Common Backbone was "split" between two fibers, dividing the signal so that 50 percent of the signal strength went to each output fiber. One of the output fibers was diverted to a secure room; the other carried communications on to AT&T’s switching equipment. The secure room contained Narus traffic analyzers and logic servers; Narus states that such devices are capable of real-time data collection (recording data for consideration) and capture at 10 gigabits per second. Certain traffic was selected and sent over a dedicated line to a "central location" for analysis. According to Marcus’s affidavit, the diverted traffic "represented all, or substantially all, of AT&T’s peering traffic in the San Francisco Bay area," and thus, "the designers of the ... configuration made no attempt, in terms of location or position of the fiber split, to exclude data sources comprised primarily of domestic data."[20] Narus's Semantic Traffic Analyzer software which runs on IBM or Dell Linux servers, using DPI technology, sorts through IP traffic at 10Gbit/s to pick out specific messages based on a targeted e-mail address, IP address or, in the case of VoIP, phone number.[21] President George W. Bush and Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales have asserted that they believe the president has the authority to order secret intercepts of telephone and e-mail exchanges between people inside the United States and their contacts abroad without obtaining a FISA warrant.[22]
the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) and the big four record labels EMI, Sony BMG, Universal Music and Warner Music have begun suing ISPs like Eircom for not doing enough about protecting their copyrights.[16] The IFPI wants ISPs to filter traffic to remove illicitly uploaded and downloaded copyrighted material from their network, despite European directive 2000/31/EC clearly stating that ISPs may not be put under a general obligation to monitor the information they transmit and directive 2002/58/EC granting European citizens a right to privacy of communications. The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) which enforces movie copyrights, on the other hand has taken the position with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that network neutrality could hurt anti-piracy technology such as Deep Packet Inspection and other forms of filtering.[17]
that is scary shit

I agree they would have to host that image you speak of, check logs and shit in order to find you that way... if they could, tor etc... but what if they're just watching from above, everything going in and out, with illegal content & IPs "fingerprinted" for flagging, you'd have to live your entire online life via proxies, vpn's, ssl and other shit just to stay safe.
End points can utilize encryption and obfuscation techniques to evade DPI actions in many cases.
 

Decent60

Patient goes beep beep beeeeeeeeeep
We have a government here hell bent on implementing mandatory data retention at ISP level (up to one year), also a firewall for banning websites that will rival china, so you can imagine the drama it caused on aussie tech gossip forums & print rags. Most of the hate is saved for this dpi stuff


that is scary shit

I agree they would have to host that image you speak of, check logs and shit in order to find you that way... if they could, tor etc... but what if they're just watching from above, everything going in and out, with illegal content & IPs "fingerprinted" for flagging, you'd have to live your entire online life via proxies, vpn's, ssl and other shit just to stay safe.
Very interesting. Although, they have to isolate the server they want to monitor and use a separate (or more) server(s) to scan the network. More than likely, need to have temp downtime in order to implement such service. I doubt they would be willing to do such a thing. As for the movie companies suing ISPs, don't think that will get very far as they are not responsible (nor have the full legal power...yet) to monitor individual users.
I do find it sad that they are willing to initiate laws about this, spend millions of dollars in time to make sure this is all being enforced on something that barely puts a dent into those big business's yearly (or even quarterly) budget when there are more "important" (please note the quotes) things out there like murders, drug shortages (legal), excessive drug trafficking (illegal), people trafficking, and just plain too much white trash roaming around here.
 

D.O.A.

These are great days we're living, bros
Very interesting. Although, they have to isolate the server they want to monitor and use a separate (or more) server(s) to scan the network. More than likely, need to have temp downtime in order to implement such service. I doubt they would be willing to do such a thing. As for the movie companies suing ISPs, don't think that will get very far as they are not responsible (nor have the full legal power...yet) to monitor individual users.
I do find it sad that they are willing to initiate laws about this, spend millions of dollars in time to make sure this is all being enforced on something that barely puts a dent into those big business's yearly (or even quarterly) budget when there are more "important" (please note the quotes) things out there like murders, drug shortages (legal), excessive drug trafficking (illegal), people trafficking, and just plain too much white trash roaming around here.
just pray the mpaa calls for this shit fall on deaf ears. Jews are good at getting their money back, with interest, and will no doubt twist a few arms until new laws are passed.
 

noobishnubs

☼TheGoodLife☼
This is already happening in some places. Comcast threatened to stop all service to me, and told me my IP was logged and I may have criminal charges brought against me if I did not take down my Crack I made for elder scrolls skyrim. How can an ISP, who owns a service I pay for, be able to do this? This is just fucking ridiculous.
 

Decent60

Patient goes beep beep beeeeeeeeeep
This is already happening in some places. Comcast threatened to stop all service to me, and told me my IP was logged and I may have criminal charges brought against me if I did not take down my Crack I made for elder scrolls skyrim. How can an ISP, who owns a service I pay for, be able to do this? This is just fucking ridiculous.
Terms of Service. Most have open-ended clauses that allow for stuff like this to happen.
 

Andria

Cutie
Thankfully I use a VPN, and use a free proxy site from a VPN-protected internet connection, when downloading or googling. Double the protection!
 

Gorgutz

Post-Mortem
they can snoop any unencrypted packets being sent, and also fuck you by IP addy if legal cunts seed something, then record the IP downloading it. I don't know if your IP is enough to come search your house tho, but i wouldn't be surprised if it is. All traffic needs to be encrypted for them to be left guessing. tor is cool but slow as fuck, it wasn't designed for downloads.
An IP address is not enough to backtrace your current location, unless the ISP provides it. Otherwise, them niggers are gonna need your MAC address as well.

The internet is about to become a very dark place I'm afraid.
 
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