An Anzac diary WW 1

An Anzac diary WW 1

Diary of an ANZAC: A Gallipoli Perspective


This is the story of Herbert Vincent Reynolds No. 622 First Field Ambulance, First AIF.




Herbert Vincent Reynolds enlisted in the 1st AIF at the age of 18
Born in Sebastopol Victoria on 16thSeptember 1896 Herbert attended Sebastopol State School until 1912 and obtained high marks for both the drawings and models he made.

Since the age of 14 Herbert was an army cadet and in 1914 when the war broke out he was called up for service. While on parade with the 8th Infantry Battalion he was told by his commanding officer to “go home” as he was too young. Once home, he obtained a letter of consent from his mother and joined up with the 4th Field Ambulance when it was formed.

The decision to go to war was a hard one for Herbert. From the age of 13 Herbert was responsible for providing for his Mother and siblings. Without his weekly income it would be hard for his family to survive without him. Nevertheless, the call to war was too strong and Herbert became one of the 421,809 men who would sign up for service during the First World War.

Over the next few months diary entries written by Herbert upon his arrival in Alexandria 1915 will be posted. They will cover Herbert’s experience in the lead up and duration of the Gallipoli campaign.

Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
1941 anniversary exhibition
1941, Tobruk, Exhibitions, 1941, North Africa, Tobruk.



1941 was a year of battle. It was a time of victories and defeat. Australian soldiers, sailors, and airmen fought their first major battles of the Second World War in North Africa and in the Mediterranean. Australian and British troops won a series of early successes in Libya and later in Syria. But they also suffered greatly on mainland Greece and on Crete. When a rapid German offensive swept the British from Libya, all that stopped the Germans from continuing into Egypt was the defiant garrison at Tobruk.


For the eight months from April until December 1941, Australian and British soldiers – with Indian, Polish, and Czech troops – held Tobruk against besieging German and Italian forces. British and Australian warships helped keep the defenders supplied, bringing in food, ammunition, and reinforcements, and evacuating the wounded. Australian airmen, meanwhile, made an important contribution to the air war fought above the desert battlefields.


2011 marks the 70th anniversary of the first Australian battles of the war. To commemorate these significant events, planning is now well under way for a special anniversary exhibition that will open at the Memorial in March 2011. Drawing on the Memorial’s rich collection of war relics, photographs, artworks, and documents, this exhibition will highlight Australia’s involvement in these early campaigns with a specific focus on the famous siege of Tobruk.

In the weeks and months to come, the Memorial’s historians and curators will be featuring some of the stories and experiences of different men and women who served in the Middle East during 1941 as we prepare for the exhibition’s opening next year.



Members of the 2/11th Battalion, having penetrated the outer defences of Tobruk, assemble again on the escarpment on the south side of the harbour after attacking ack ack gun positions. The men were all from C Company, mostly from 14 platoon, 22 January 1941. 005392



When the Australians captured Tobruk in January 1941, they found large amounts of abandoned Italian equipment and stockpiles of ammunition. In part to relieve boredom and in part to help support the British artillery, the Australian infantrymen became part-time gunners using captured Italian guns. Learning largely through trial and error, the “bush artillery” quickly became a feature of Tobruk’s defences. Infantrymen from the 2/17th Battalion with an Italian 75mm gun wait to go into action, 27 August 1941. 020277
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
AboutSaturday 19th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘One of our planes passed over here this morning and went down to the cape, he dropped a bomb about half way down. A plane flew over towards Maidos about 2pm and about an hour later another bombed the enemy trenches opposite Quins Post. At about 6pm another flew over and went down to the Cape. A seaplane has been directing a Monitors fire this afternoon on enemy concentrated on the No 2 A.S.C. Depot, a habit they have of shelling the Depot at sunset lately. A couple of heavy howitzer shells from the enemy exploded very near our camp today.’



Bronze statue of a First World War soldier wearing 'Anzac uniform' (bare torso, shorts made from cut down trousers, hat, boots and socks) carrying three four-gallon tins used for water storage and collection. ART14074
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Monday 21st June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘During the night a heavy artillery action which has continued off and on during the day has been in progress down at Helles. The enemy snipers* who have been enfilading Brighton beach with rifle fire have been very active lately and have succeeded in wounding half a dozen during the last few days. The range at which they have to fire makes accurate shooting impossible, but never the less they manage to bag an occasional victim and make the beach unsafe while they are at it. At about 4pm a monitor put in an appearance and shelled the enemy on Kaba Tepe at the same time. Received a couple of letters today.’

*Turkish snipers were trained to attack officers over the rest of the men.

For the classroom: What are the advantages of eliminating your enemies officers in battle?


A metal loophole plate used by the 1st Battalion, showing the marks of Turkish snipers' bullets. It had only been in position a few days. A01002
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
AboutTuesday 22nd June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.



‘At about 2am an aeroplane could be heard flying overhead but it could not be seen. One of our new large planes flew over about 11am. The monitor appeared again at about 4pm and we watched her shells exploding near Achi Baba. A report today states that the French have taken and are holding two lines of enemy trenches at Cape Helles. We were unable to get anything from the canteen ship and our money was returned to us today. The 1st Light Horse Field Ambulance relieved us of Capt. Marks station in Victoria Gully today.’



'recto: Achi Baba, from Tommy's Trench, Helles; verso: The top of the Taurus Mountains' By George Lambert ART02849
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Wednesday 23rd June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


Soldiers on the beach at Anzac Cove. Some of the men are attending to daily duties while others are resting on the sand or swimming. P02647.026
‘A large seaplane was flying around here at about 9am. There were a large number of us swimming at the cove at about 3pm when the enemy began to shell the beach from the direction of Anafata. We wasted no time in getting out and taking cover in the heaps of stores along the beach, but there were six casualties before everyone got out. Our artillery has been shelling the Olive Grove off and on during the day, the enemy have been quiet from that direction, their guns have not fired a shot. A report today states that two enemy aeroplanes flew over our positions at Helles this morning and one was forces down in our lines and captured.’

For the classroom: What advantages are there to capturing an enemy behind your own lines?


Soldiers on the beach at Anzac Cove. Some of the men are attending to daily duties while others are resting on the sand or swimming. P02647.026
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Thursday 24th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC Lea

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.



‘The 5th Battery, City of Glasgow R.F.A came ashore this afternoon with their 5inch howitzers. After sunset they hauled them round into Victoria Gully just below our camp. Bill Rogers, one of the mates was rather badly wounded by Shrapnel this afternoon near the C.C. Station. At about 6pm both our artillery and the enemys got very active, the enemy have not troubled us from the direction of Kaba Tepe again today, though a gun from that direction has been firing at the minesweepers and T.B.D’s throughout the day.’


View of No 1 Casualty Clearing Station (CSS) taken about 4 weeks after the landing. A01500
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Friday 25th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘An aeroplane passed over here at about 11am but it was hard to distinguish who it belonged to. The distinguishing mark on our planes is a red, white and blue circle on each wing. The enemy is the same as the Germans, a black cross. At about 3pm the Lord Nelson accompanied by a balloon ship, and escorted by T.B.D’s took up position about midway between Imbros and Kaba Tepe point and from there fired broadside after broadside at the enemy away inland towards Maidos, the balloon from the balloon ship directed her fire. The enemy field guns began firing at the battleship but she took no notice of them, they could be seen flashing on the high ridge in front of our right flank. At about 4.30pm when the Lord Nelson and other boats steamed off, great columns of dense smoke could be seen rising away to the south-east towards Maidos. An enemy aeroplane flew over our lines at about 5pm and set a bundle of papers loose but the wind carried them all into enemy territory.’

For the classroom: List the advantages and disadvantages of using an observation balloon instead of an aeroplane.


The balloon ship "HECLA". H16476
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Saturday 26th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.



‘Things have been extremely quiet. Reported sick this morning with a heavy cold and extremely sore throat which has been troubling me now for some days. The L.H.F. Ambulance are leaving for Lemnos and we took over the dressing station from them today. Every third morning we have to turn out at 7am for half an hours physical drill, it is by no means a popular innovation. The 5inch howitzers were hauled after sunset into positions prepared for them in Clarkes Gully, it was heavy and strenuous work hauling them up the slopes of these hills but many willing hands managed the job alright. These howitzers fire a 50 pound lidite shell.’

For the classroom: Why would they be using men to pull the artillery up the hill instead of horses or mules?


Infantrynmen hauling the 4.7 Naval gun up the slope of Victoria Gully to its position on the right at ANZAC. J06125
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
AboutSunday 27th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘Feeling very much off colour and was relieved of duty for the day. About 6pm an outburst of rifle and machine gun fire followed by heavy fire from both our artillery and the enemys took place and continued for about an hour. A seaplane flew very low over Kaba Tepe and dropped 4 bombs in quick succession at about 6am. The new howitzers fired a few shells today, they make a peculiar whistling sound going through the air, quite a different sound to the high velocity shells from the field guns.’

*Over time Herbert was able to identify the difference in weaponry through sound alone.

For the classroom: Close your eyes and see how many sounds you can identify in your classroom.


A gun position of the Highes Battery in the front line at ANZAC. J06134
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Monday 28th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘At about 9am a fleet of minesweepers and half a dozen T.B.D’s steamed across from Imbros towards the Cape, followed by a light cruiser, a balloon ship and more T.B.D’s. At about 10am a terrific bombardment commenced down the Cape and continued throughout the day, the cruiser and a number of destroyers shelled the enemy from positions between Kaba Tepe and the Cape and the Monitor Humber from a position off Imbros and directed by the captive balloon, shelled the enemy positions on Achi Baba. An enemy aeroplane put in an appearance about 11.30am and again later at about 3pm. It attempted to destroy the captive balloon on the Ark Royal, but after 3 bombs failed to hit their mark he gave up and returned to the enemy lines. At about 1pm our infantry made a bluff attack from our right flank in order to assist our troops at Helles where a big offensive has been commenced. By making a demonstration here it prevents the enemy sending any troops from here to reinforce his troops down south. At about 5pm our troops retired into their trenches and things got rather quiet again, after being extremely lively during the afternoon. The Light Horse took a prominent part in the operations today. One of our mates Pte W Summers* was killed by a bullet in the head and another named Strout was rather badly wounded in the leg. At about 9pm when it was fairly dark a party of us went along to the barricade on our right flank to get some wounded in along the beach, the enemy sent up two star shells while we were at it and made us feel rather uncomfortable as they light the place up like day for about 15 seconds.’
 
OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Tuesday 29th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.



‘Headquarters report that the demonstration here yesterday was very successful and thanks to all those who took part in it. We suffered a number of casualties but not what we expected. All day a constant rumble of heavy artillery action could be heard from Helles. At about 11pm a heavy dust storm sprang up and made things extremely uncomfortable for us at Clarkes Gully station where we were on duty. When the storm started an outburst of heavy rifle fire broke out but it did not last for long. A progress was made by the Allies at Helles yesterday and they advanced their lines up to 1000 yards in place.’


Two stretcher bearers carrying a wounded man from a dressing station run by C Section, 7th Australian Field Ambulance, in Chailak Dere, to the casualty clearing station on the beach at Anzac Cove. C02422
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Wednesday 30th June 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘We returned to our camp at 7am and enjoyed a swim in the breakers which were coming fast and heavy, it is not often there are any decent waves here to get amongst. All the landing stages were more or less damaged by the rough sea that has been running all day and everything moveable was thrown high and dry up on the beach. A seaplane flew over about 7am. At about 9pm a thunder storm passed over but we got very little rain, a good fall of rain now would be welcome as we are depending on the water from the boats for our supply, the holes in the gullies are all dry and there is no water other than that in our vicinity except salt sea water.’


'Gawd help the first bloomin' Turk I see to-night!!' By Norman Cameron Wimbush ART00033
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Thursday 1st July 1915 – Diary of HV Reynolds

Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘At 7am a large biplane circled overhead for about an hour. The sea has again been rather rough. While swimming this evening I got a rather bad cut on the left foot from a broken bottle.’

For the classroom: What are the dangers for Herbert after receiving a cut to his foot?


Advertisement for Spiller, Booser & Co.Advertisement for Spiller, Booser & Co. ART00037.004
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Friday 2nd July 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds

Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘Things have been very quiet all day. One of our planes flew over at about 6pm. Considerable quantities of 4 by 4 timber and corrugated iron have been brought ashore lately. The 5inch howitzers have been firing a few rounds this evening.’

For the classroom: With all these materials being brought ashore what might they be building?

Soldiers constructing dugouts near the beach north of Anzac Cove.Soldiers constructing dugouts near the beach north of Anzac Cove. C01623
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Saturday 3rd July 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘At about 3pm a light cruiser, possible the Talbot came on the scene, and from a position between Imbros and Kaba Tepe Point fired 3 shots at some enemy position away inland, then steamed off, returning after dark to the same position. She fired shell after shell away inland. Two other light cruisers were further down towards the Cape with their searchlights trained on the land. The enemy fired over some very powerful shells today.’


A collection of captured German and Turkish ammunition on display. B00929
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Sunday 4th July 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.


‘The cruisers were firing all night and they steamed off just after day break. Things have been very quiet here today. An explosion occurred on the ridge a little to the west of Achi Baba about 10am, we noticed a huge column of smoke shoot skywards, but are unable to tell what it is.’



Smoke billows skyward from the explosion of a large artillery shell on Turkish positions at Anzac. P02282.019
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Monday 5th July 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.



‘At daybreak the enemy artillery got very active. A heavy enemy gun has exploded harmlessly on the ridge above the stores or went into the sea where they sent up a column of water about 20 feet into the air, evidently our depot is in a safety zone as far as this particular gun is concerned. The 6inch howitzers were landed here today. A fleet of about 20 minesweepers have been patrolling an area of sea between Imbros and Cape Helles for certain periods during the past few days. This evening the 16th Batt. Embarked on minesweepers and barges for Imbros where they are going for a spell. The enemy gave them a pretty warm farewell as his artillery shelled them pretty heavily with shrapnel.’

For the classroom: Shrapnel is a term given to the shards of metal that spray out after a shell explodes. To recreate the spray pattern drop a water balloon onto concrete from a chair or small ladder



Two 11.2 inch shells from the German battle cruiser Goeben in the Narrows, which is about eight miles away, exploding in the sea at Anzac Cove. A03088
 

Attachments

OP
wino

wino

DILLIGAF
Tuesday 6th July 1915- Diary of HV Reynolds
Diary of an ANZAC

Please note: Care has been taken to transcribe these entries without alteration to preserve the original language of Herbert Vincent Reynolds.



‘A large enemy shell put one of the No9 Battery guns out of action and killed some of the crew yesterday. Just before sunset the enemy guns in the Olive Grove opened fire with shrapnel on our camp, it kept us all under cover while it lasted. But no damage was done. According to a headquarters report today the explosion we saw on Achi Baba last Sunday was caused by a 6inch enemy shell exploding in a French ammunition pit, it also stated that during the recent operations at Cape Helles, a body of the 10th Ghurkas were driven out of their trenched by an enemy bomb attack, but the position was retaken again in an attack made by the Inniskilin Fusiliers.’

*Trench warfare is commonly fought back and forth over the same area. Once an enemy trench is captured it is probable that eventually the enemy will push you back out again.



Informal group portrait of members of 9th Battery, 3rd Field Artillery, in front of their 18 pounder field gun on the day they were evacuated. P00046.044
 

Attachments

Top