Castle Frankenstein

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
All textual content and photographic material is Copyright of their respective owners.

For many of us gore hounds, Frankenstein, along with Dracula, might be among the first "monsters" that we read about or watched in a movie.

Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by the English author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley that tells the story of a young science student Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque but sentient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment.

Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition of the novel was published anonymously in London in 1818, when she was 20.

Set 1. Screen adaptations of Frankenstein

1. First movie - 1910
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2. Boris Karloff as Frankenstein - 1939
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3.
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
It was in June 1816, 200 years ago, that a group of five young people from England gathered in a villa overlooking Lake Geneva and tried to scare each other with ghost stories.

One of them, 18-year-old Mary Godwin, had a "waking dream" which she recounted one night and transfixed her audience, which included the English romantic poet Lord Byron.

Mary was accompanied by her future husband, the 23-year-old poet Percy Shelley, who had abandoned his first wife and children to elope with Mary.

Byron encouraged Mary to write her scary story down; she started immediately and called it "Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus."
 
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
Less than 100 kilometers to the northeast of the village, on the other side of the river, rise the walls of Castle Frankenstein near Darmstadt, the German birthplace of Johann Conrad Dippel, an alchemist who later experimented with human bodies.

Shelley traveled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the River Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim which is just 17 km (10 mi) away from Frankenstein Castle, where, two centuries before, an alchemist was engaged in experiments. It's possible, but unknown whether Mary had time to visit the Burg and castle.

Set 3.

1.
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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
castle-frankenstein-9-Darmstadt-Germany.jpg
 
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
The name first appeared in a document of 1146 mentioning the free nobleman (Edelfrei) Helenger of Frankenstein. But the beginning of the castle is assumed to be at an earlier date because the erection of a defensive tower around 1100 is reported in various documents.

The tower belonged to nearby Limburg Abbey in charge of security on the road to Speyer, Dürkheim und Worms. In 1205, the monastery commissioned the counts of Leiningen with this task. The counts had the tower expanded to a castle in the beginning of the 13th. century.

Set 5.

1.
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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
castle-frankenstein-19-Darmstadt-Germany.jpg
 
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
From 1204 to 1231, documents mention the knights Marquard, Friedrich and Helenger von Frankenstein as administrators in charge of the castle.

Around 1390 Frankenstein Castle became a joint heritage castle when Limburg Abbey pledged half of the castle to the Lords of Einselthum.

A part of this pledge was taken over by the counts of Nassau -Saarbrücken and Leiningen-Hardenburg in the beginning of the 15th century.

Set 6.

1.
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2.
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3. The Frankenstein Castle chapel.
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4.
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5.
castle-frankenstein-24-Darmstadt-Germany.jpg
 
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
In the second half of the 15th. century the castle was damaged in the struggles between Prince-elector Frederick I and Count Palatine Ludwig I of Zweibrücken.

The castle suffered further damage, presumably in 1512, when the Count of Nassau conquered it on orders of emperor Maximilian I. During the German Peasants' War the castle was destroyed and was considered uninhabitable as of 1560.

Nevertheless it served military purposes because of its strategic position.

Set 7.

1.
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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
castle-frankenstein-29-Darmstadt-Germany.jpg
 
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
In the Thirty Years' War the Spanish General Ambrosio Spinola captured the castle.

In the War of the Spanish Succession it was used to accommodate French troops.

It is confirmed that these troops still used the castle chapel for mass in 1703.

Set 8.

1.
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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
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OneSickOne

Kinky as a twisted chain
Excellent story and pictures. I read Mary Shelly's Frankenstein and I must say that I was very disappointed in it. I think the reason was that I was so old when I read it that I had seen untold numbers of movie versions, none of which were really true to the book, so the book was not what I expected.
 
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DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
Great thread and WHAT LUCK ! Finding all those pics with your stamp on them :tu:
Maybe next time I get a bunch of images together, prepped and ready to upload they'll come with a nice DH watermark instead of a small stamp :).

Problem is that there aren't any on the net...:shrug:
 

McM

Krautnigger
Yo, there's a lot of castles here. Some are fully restaurated and have a museum inside, mostly old weapons and household stuff.
Always a nice idea for a day-trip.
 
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