Dec. 26, 2004 Tsunami

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
There are a few images scattered here and there regarding the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami on GG, but usually wrongly identified or just stuck in a thread here or there. I posted a huge set for my old site back when I started and was surprised when I looked and found that there wasn't a thread for the 2004 Tsunami on GG.

So I'm going to fix that and get one going that will include images that I had from back when it happened and a shitload of new images that I hadn't seen before. Because there are so many images from so many different areas, I did not get into trying to describe the when and wheres of each image: there are just too many. So, they are simply named, but not necessarily in any particular order.

If you collect/download images like this - grab these ones as many of them are VERY difficult to find.

As usual, I will include details in each post that relate to the events of the Tsunami of 2004.

I ask that folks hold off on posting any related pics that they might have until I can unload the ones that I have and avoid reposts and such. As I said, I have ALOT of images and would like to get them all posted and then let folks know that they can post what they might have. This last post will clearly state that I am done (lols): but until then...I will still be uploading. Thanks : ).

The thread will deal with several aspects of the 2004 Tsunami: early photos before people knew what was happening; destruction as it was occurring; destruction and death in the aftermath of the Tsunami; and bodies....bodies, bodies, bodies. Several "then and now" images will also be posted.

At the end I will also include links to several videos taken by tourists as the disaster unfolded.

Cheers & Beers and onto the 2004 Tsunami!
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake was an undersea megathrust earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC on Sunday, 26 December 2004, with an epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. The quake itself is known by the scientific community as the Sumatra–Andaman earthquake. The resulting tsunami is given various names, including the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, South Asian tsunami, Indonesian tsunami, and Boxing Day tsunami.

Set 1.

thread-thumb.jpg


Waves arrive.

1. Tourists on a beach as the tsunami builds along the horizon.
tide-out-tsunami-in-1st-wave-dec26-04.jpg


2. Two police boats in the path. One was lost with all hands on deck while the second was pushed far inland.
2-thai-police-boats-tsuanmi-closes-dec26-04.jpg


3. Waves continue to build: tourists begin to panic on the beach.
tsunami-advance-police-boats-gone-dec26-04.jpg


4. A tsunami wave crashes into a coastal reort area.
tsunami-waves-hit-shore1.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"The earthquake was caused by subduction and triggered a series of devastating tsunamis along the coasts of most landmasses bordering the Indian Ocean, killing over 230,000 people in fourteen countries, and inundating coastal communities with waves up to 30 meters (98 ft) high. It was one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history. Indonesia was the hardest-hit country, followed by Sri Lanka, India, and Thailand."

Set 2.


1. People on the beach realize that things are way wrong and begin to run. To the very right of the photo is a woman who spots her family still in the water the 1st tsunami wave approaches.
tsunami-mother-runs-for-family1-Dec2004.jpg


2. Wave still approaching, the woman (middle) continues to run to her family.
tsunami-mother-runs-for-family2-Dec2004.jpg


3. The wave hits the sail boats, with a second wave behind it. The woman's family is on the move inshore as she reaches them. Amazingly, the woman and her family all survived.
tsunami-mother-runs-for-family3-Dec2004.jpg


The above images occurred after the sea/tide had suddenly receded into the ocean, exposing more of the beach than ever seen. This drew many to the newly exposed beach.
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"With a magnitude of Mw 9.1–9.3, it is the third largest earthquake ever recorded on a seismograph. The earthquake had the longest duration of faulting ever observed, between 8.3 and 10 minutes. It caused the entire planet to vibrate as much as 1 centimetre (0.4 inches) and triggered other earthquakes as far away as Alaska. Its epicentre was between Simeulue and mainland Indonesia. The plight of the affected people and countries prompted a worldwide humanitarian response. In all, the worldwide community donated more than $14 billion (2004 US$) in humanitarian aid."

Set 4.


1. Before.
tsunami-resort-pool1-dec2004.jpg


2. Wave hits.
tsunami-resort-pool2-dec2004.jpg


3. Water recedes.
tsunami-resort-pool3-dec2004.jpg


4. After.
tsunami-resort-pool4-dec2004.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"Despite a lag of up to several hours between the earthquake and the impact of the tsunami, nearly all of the victims were taken completely by surprise. There were no tsunami warning systems in the Indian Ocean to detect tsunamis or to warn the general populace living around the ocean.

Tsunami detection is not easy because while a tsunami is in deep water it has little height and a network of sensors is needed to detect it. Setting up the communications infrastructure to issue timely warnings is an even bigger problem, particularly in a relatively poor part of the world."

Set 5.


Death.

1.
victims1-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


2.
victims2-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


3.
victims3-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


4.
victims4-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"The first warning sign of a possible tsunami is the earthquake itself. However, tsunami can strike thousands of kilometres away where the earthquake is only felt weakly or not at all. Also, in the minutes preceding a tsunami strike, the sea often recedes temporarily from the coast.

Around the Indian Ocean, this rare sight reportedly induced people, especially children, to visit the coast to investigate and collect stranded fish on as much as 2.5 km (1.6 mi) of exposed beach, with fatal results. However, not all tsunami causes this "disappearing sea" effect. In some cases, there are no warning signs at all: the sea will suddenly swell without retreating, surprising many people and giving them little time to flee."

Set 7.


Death.

9.
victims9-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


10.
victims10-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


11.
victims11-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


12.
victims12-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"According to the U.S. Geological Survey a total of 227,898 people died. Measured in lives lost, this is one of the ten worst earthquakes in recorded history, as well as the single worst tsunami in history. Indonesia was the worst affected area, with most death toll estimates at around 170,000. However, another report by health minister Fadilah Supari has estimated the death total to be as high as 220,000 in Indonesia alone, giving a total of 280,000 casualties."

Set 10.

Death.

1.
victims13-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


2.
victims14-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


3.
victims15-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


4.
victims16-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"The tsunami caused serious damage and deaths as far as the east coast of Africa, with the farthest recorded death due to the tsunami occurring at Rooi Els in South Africa, 8,000 km (5,000 mi) away from the epicentre. In total, eight people in South Africa died due to abnormally high sea levels and waves."

Set 12.

Damage.

1.
damage9-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


2.
damage10-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


3.
damage11-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


4.
damage12-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"Relief agencies report that one-third of the dead appear to be children. This is a result of the high proportion of children in the populations of many of the affected regions and because children were the least able to resist being overcome by the surging waters. Oxfam went on to report that as many as four times more women than men were killed in some regions because they were waiting on the beach for the fishermen to return and looking after their children in the houses."

Set 15.

Death.

1.
victims30-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


2.
victims31-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


3.
victims32-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg


4.
victims33-indian-tsunami-dec2004.jpg
 
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