Diabetic: Foot Rot

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"Diabetic foot problems are among the most serious and costly complications of diabetes. The rising prevalence of diabetes all over the world has brought with it an increase in the number of lower limb amputations performed as a result of the disease.

Epidemiological reports indicate that over one million amputations are performed on people with diabetes each year. This amounts to a leg being lost to diabetes somewhere in the world every 30 seconds. But having the recent prevalence data of 2011 available means that nowadays every 20 seconds a lower leg is lost due to diabetes globally."

Set 1.

1. Patient's foot as appeared when treatment was sought. Notice that toes have been previously amputated.
diabetic1-foot-infection1.jpg


2.
diabetic1-foot-infection2.jpg


3.
diabetic1-foot-infection3.jpg


4. Debriding.
diabetic1-foot-infection4.jpg


5.
diabetic1-foot-infection5.jpg


6. Pre-skin graft.
diabetic1-foot-infection6.jpg


7. Foot healing after skin grafting applied.
diabetic1-foot-infection7-grafted.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
"A majority of these amputations are preceded by ulcers. Only two-thirds of ulcers will eventually heal and the remainder may result in some form of amputation. The median time of healing for an ulcer is approximately six months. Both ulcers and amputations have an enormous impact on people’s lives, often leading to reduced independence, social isolation and psychological stress.

The diabetic foot is also a significant economic problem, particularly if amputation results in prolonged hospitalization, rehabilitation, and an increased need for home care and social services."

Set 2.

8. Patient's presenting problem.
diabetic2-foot-infection1.jpg


9.
diabetic2-foot-infection2.jpg


10. Debriding.
diabetic2-foot-infection3.jpg


11.
diabetic2-foot-infection4.jpg


12. Grafted and healing.
diabetic2-foot-infection5.jpg
 
OP
DeathHand

DeathHand

Let It All Bleed Out
Despite being one of the most serious and costly complications of diabetes, foot complications can be effectively prevented. By implementing a care strategy that combines prevention, the multidisciplinary treatment of foot ulcers, appropriate organization, close monitoring, and education of people with diabetes and healthcare professionals, it is possible to reduce amputation rates by up to 85%.

Set 3.

13. Foot upon initial treatment.
diabetic3-foot-infection1.jpg


14. Debrided.
diabetic3-foot-infection2.jpg


15.
diabetic3-foot-infection3.jpg


16. Healing after skin graft.
diabetic3-foot-infection4.jpg
 
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