Documentaries (4 Viewers)

DIVISION77

First, Last & Always

The best doc covering the L.A. Riots of 1992.

Most of it is coverage that wasn't released to the public and also quite a bit of early Fox news coverage. Rough to watch.
 

Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot



Founded in 1865, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) extended into almost every southern state by 1870 and became a vehicle for white southern resistance to the Republican Party’s Reconstruction-era policies aimed at establishing political and economic equality for Black Americans. Its members waged an underground campaign of intimidation and violence directed at white and Black Republican leaders. Though Congress passed legislation designed to curb Klan terrorism, the organization saw its primary goal–the reestablishment of white supremacy–fulfilled through Democratic victories in state legislatures across the South in the 1870s. After a period of decline, white Protestant nativist groups revived the Klan in the early 20th century, burning crosses and staging rallies, parades and marches denouncing immigrants, Catholics, Jews, African Americans and organized labor.

The civil rights movement of the 1960s also saw a surge of Ku Klux Klan activity, including bombings of Black schools and churches and violence against Black and white activists in the South.A group including many former Confederate veterans founded the first branch of the Ku Klux Klan as a social club in Pulaski, Tennessee, in 1865. The first two words of the organization’s name supposedly derived from the Greek word “kyklos,” meaning circle. In the summer of 1867, local branches of the Klan met in a general organizing convention and established what they called an “Invisible Empire of the South.” Leading Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest was chosen as the first leader, or “grand wizard,” of the Klan; he presided over a hierarchy of grand dragons, grand titans and grand cyclops'.

*Please click the yellow link for further info.






20th March 1922: Members of the white supremacist movement, the Ku Klux Klan standing by an aeroplane, out of which they dropped publicity leaflets over Washington DC.



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Ku Klux Klansmen draping giant American flag over Capitol steps.



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A general view of hooded Klansmen parading through the streets of Long Branch, New Jersey, July 4, 1924.



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Supporters of the Ku Klux Klan march May 4, 1989, Stone Mountain, Georgia.



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Ku Klux Klan cartoon, with the caption 'A prospective scene in the 'City of Oaks,' 4th of March, 1869. The above cut represents the fate in store for those great pests of Southern society - the carpet bagger and scallawag - if found in Dixie's Land after the break of day on the 4th of March next.' USA, 4 March 1869.



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Ku Klux Klan members gather in hooded robes for an initiation on August 13, 1923 in Mississippi.



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Ku Klux Klan members supporting Barry Goldwater's campaign for the presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention, San Francisco, California, as an African American man pushes signs back: 12 July 1964.



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Bird's eye vied ow Ku Klux Klan parade down Pennsylvania Avenue with the Capitol building in the background on September 13, 1926 in Washington, D.C.



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Ku Klux Klan initiation ceremony in Atlanta, Georgia.



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Two Klu Klux Klansmen on horseback.



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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot

Voodoo



Voodoo is a sensationalized pop-culture caricature of voudon, an Afro-Caribbean religion that originated in Haiti, though followers can be found in Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Brazil, the United States and elsewhere. It has very little to do with so-called voodoo dolls or zombies. Voudon refers to "a whole assortment of cultural elements: personal creeds and practices, including an elaborate system of folk medical practices; a system of ethics transmitted across generations [including] proverbs, stories, songs, and folklore... voudon is more than belief; it is a way of life," wrote Leslie Desmangles, a Haitian professor at Hartford's Trinity College in "The Encyclopedia of the Paranormal" (Prometheus Books, 1996). Voudon teaches belief in a supreme being called Bondye, an unknowable and uninvolved creator god. Voudon believers worship many spirits (called loa), each one of whom is responsible for a specific domain or part of life.

So, for example, if you are a farmer you might give praise and offerings to the spirit of agriculture; if you are suffering from unrequited love, you would praise or leave offerings for Erzulie Freda, the spirit of love, and so on. In addition to helping (or impeding) human affairs, loa can also manifest themselves by possessing the bodies of their worshipers.Followers of voudon also believe in a universal energy and a soul that can leave the body during dreams and spirit possession. In Christian theology, spiritual possession is usually considered to be an act of evil, either Satan or some demonic entity trying to enter an unwilling human vessel. In voudon, however, possession by loa is desired. In a ceremony guided by a priest or priestess, this possession is considered a valuable, first-hand spiritual experience and connection with the spirit world.

*Please click the yellow link for further info.




Cropped hands inserting a straight pin in a voodoo doll.

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A Voodoo dancer performs during the Voodoo festival on January 10, 2012 in Ouidah, Benin. Ouidah is Benin's Voodoo heartland, and thought to be the spiritual birthplace of Voodoo or Vodun as it known in Benin. Shrouded in mystery and often misunderstood, Voodoo was acknowledged as an official religion in Benin in 1989, and is increasing in popularity with around 17 percent of the population following it. A week of activity centred around the worship of Voodoo culminates on the 10th of January when people from across Benin as well as Togo and Nigeria decend on the town for the annual Voodoo festival.

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A Voodoo devotee in a trance performs at the annual Voodoo Festival on January 10, 2017 in Ouidah.

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Nigerian 'Voodoo Spirits' walk the streets on January 10, 2012 in Ouidah, Benin. Each spirit represents the reincarnation of a dead member of the Nigerian 'Nagu' clan. Ouidah is Benin's Voodoo heartland, and thought to be the spiritual birthplace of Voodoo or Vodun as it known in Benin.

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A voodoo devotee with a skull on top of his head is seen during ceremonies honoring the Haitian voodoo spirit of Baron Samdi and Gede on the Day of the Dead in the Cementery of Cite Soleil, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti on November 1, 2017. Voodoo believers and devotees offer candles, alcohol and food. The Day of the Dead is celebrated on the first two days of November during All Saints and All Souls Day.

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Togo. Surrounding of Lomé. Voodoo Ceremony.

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A woman in trance crawls on the ground floor to a source tree sacred to atone for their sins, as part of an initiation ritual voodoo on April 08, 2012 in Souvenance, Haiti.

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Voodoo fetishes at the entrance of a convent. Togoville, Togo.

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Two Haitian mambo, or women priests, perform ritual prayers to the voodoo god of work.

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A voodoo devotee in a trance, in the role of a spirit known as a Gede takes a body from a grave in a cemetery in Port-au-Prince, Haiti on November 1, 2015, while taking part in the ceremonies honoring the Haitian voodoo spirits of Baron Samdi and Gede during Day of the Dead.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot



One of the most horrific terms in history was used by Nazi Germany to designate human beings whose lives were unimportant, or those who should be killed outright: Lebensunwertes Leben, or "life unworthy of life". The phrase was applied to the mentally impaired and later to the "racially inferior," or "sexually deviant," as well as to "enemies of the state" both internal and external. From very early in the war, part of Nazi policy was to murder civilians en masse, especially targeting Jews. Later in the war, this policy grew into Hitler's "final solution", the complete extermination of the Jews.

It began with Einsatzgruppen death squads in the East, which killed some 1,000,000 people in numerous massacres, and continued in concentration camps where prisoners were actively denied proper food and health care. It culminated in the construction of extermination camps -- government facilities whose entire purpose was the systematic murder and disposal of massive numbers of people. In 1945, as advancing Allied troops began discovering these camps, they found the results of these policies: hundreds of thousands of starving and sick prisoners locked in with thousands of dead bodies. They encountered evidence of gas chambers and high-volume crematoriums, as well as thousands of mass graves, documentation of awful medical experimentation, and much more. The Nazis killed more than 10 million people in this manner, including 6 million Jews.

*Please click the yellow link for further info.





Auschwitz survivor Mr. Leon Greenman, prison number 98288, displays his number tattoo on December 9, 2004 at the Jewish Museum in London, England.

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Survivors at Buchenwald Concentration Camp remain in their barracks after liberation by Allies on April 16, 1945.

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The prison uniform of Auschwitz survivor Mr Leon Greenman, priosoner number 98288 is displayed on December 9, 2004 at the Jewish Museum in London, England. Mr. Greenman O.B.E age 93 and a British citizen, spent three years of his life in six different concentration camps during World War II and since 1946 he has tirelessly recounted his life through his personal exhibition at the museum where he conducts educational events to all age groups.

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Soviet red army soldiers of the first ukrainian front with liberated prisoners of the auschwitz concentration camp in oswiecim, poland, 1945.

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The Auschwitz concentration camp is located about 50 km from Krakow. The picture shows railway carriage wagon arriving into camp Auschwitz II; Birkenau in Poland.

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Sets of prisoner identification photos of child inmates of the German Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau, Poland, during World War II.

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A U.S. 7th Army medical corpsman, newly arrived with liberating troops, looks into a train car piled with the emaciated and mutilated corpses of men from the Dachau-Birkenau concentration camps.

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U.S. Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky, Chairman of the House-Senate Committee on War Crimes, visits the camp at Buchenwald on April 24, 1945 while on an evidence-gathering tour. He looks grimly at emaciated corpses piled on the ground.

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Two U. S. soldiers look at a corpse in an oven at a liberated concentration camp in Germany. April 8-24, 1945.

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A picture taken on December 17, 2018 in Herrlisheim shows jewish headstones tagged with swastika symbol at a Jewish cemetery, eastern France.

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