Orville Lynn Majors

b2ux

Banned
Orville Lynn Majors




Classification: Serial killer
Characteristics: Poisoner - Nurse - He hated elderly people and he believed that they "should be gassed"
Number of victims: 6 +
Date of murders: 1994 - 1995
Date of arrest: December 29, 1997
Date of birth: 1941
Victims profile: Mary Ann Alderson, 69; Dorothea Hixon, 80; Cecil Smith, 74; Luella Hopkins, 89; Margaret Hornick, 79; Freddie Wilson, 56; and Derek Maxwell, Sr., 64 (patients)
Method of murder: Poisoning (lethal doses of potassium chloride and epinephrine)
Location: Clinton, Indiana, USA
Status: Sentenced to 360 years in prison on November 13, 1999

Orville Lynn Majors (born 24 April 1961) is a former licensed practical nurse from Clinton, Indiana who was convicted of murdering his patients.

Though he was only tried for six murders, he is believed to have committed as many as 130 between 1993 and 1995, the period of time for which he was employed by the hospital where the deaths occurred, and for which he was investigated.

It was reported that he murdered patients who were demanding, whiny, or disproportionately added to his work load.

Suspicion

Suspicion first developed when a large number of deaths began occurring at Vermillion County Hospital, where Majors worked. Prior to the time when Majors began employment at the hospital, an average of around 26 patients died annually.

After Majors started working at the facility, however, this rate skyrocketed to more than 100 per year, with nearly one out of every three patients admitted to the hospital dying.

Suspicion in reference to the large number of deaths landed on Majors in part because of his behaviors and attitudes, and a supervisory study that determined that nearly twice as many patients died when Majors was on duty than with any other nurses.

Additionally, Majors was the only nurse present at the deaths of seven patients. He was believed to be injecting potassium chloride as his murder weapon. The license of Majors to practice nursing was suspended in 1995, leading to termination of his employment, and the death rate at the hospital dropped to prior levels.

Prosecution and trial

After the state of Indiana launched a criminal investigation, Majors was arrested in December 1997. A total of 79 witnesses were called to the stand at his trial. Some of the witnesses testified that he hated elderly people, and that he believed that they "should be gassed".

A judge ruled that the supervisory study that showed the number of deaths rose during the duration of Majors' employment at the hospital was inadmissible as evidence because Majors was only being tried for six murders. However, other evidence that was admissible included witnesses who heard Majors refer to elderly patients as "a waste" and by various derogatory terms. Additionally, some of the deadly substances that were allegedly used in the murders were found at his house.

In October 1999, Majors was found guilty of murdering six patients, and was sentenced to 360 years in prison.


Orville Lynn Majors

INDIANAPOLIS (March 2, 2000) -- Convicted murderer Orville Lynn Majors' bid for a new trial suffered a setback Wednesday when the judge in the case rejected Majors' claims of juror misconduct.

Clay Circuit Judge Ernest Yelton said he found no evidence of alcohol misuse by jurors, as claimed in a defense motion for Majors, a former nurse convicted of killing six hospital patients in 1994 and 1995 through heart-stopping injections.

Yelton also rejected claims that jurors were subjected to improper influence by law enforcement officers during the six-week trial.

The defense had cited statements made by one of the jurors who voted to convict Majors. Ronda Baldwin said she was particularly bothered by social gatherings for the jurors at the home of the Clay County sheriff.

The two outings included free alcohol and were attended by some members of the State Police, the primary agency that investigated Majors. Baldwin said the gatherings made her feel uncomfortable.

But Yelton said in his ruling that none of the officers who attended the outings had any part in the investigation.

And -- in rejecting the argument that Majors did not receive a fair trial -- Yelton repeatedly questioned Baldwin's credibility.

"She focuses on an innocent snippet of fact and then proceeds to weave it into a negative inference," the judge wrote.

But Baldwin told The Indianapolis Star on Wednesday that she believed then -- and does now -- that some of the incidents that transpired during the trial were "out of place."

She said she puts herself in the position of the defendant, on trial for his life.

"This wasn't to hurt anybody or cause anybody any pain," she said of her charges.

"I was telling the truth, what I experienced."

Yelton, though, defended the right of jurors to reasonable diversions when court is adjourned for the day. He noted that jurors in the Majors case spent most of the trial away from their families in Miami County. Jurors were tasked with digesting the testimony of 77 witnesses, plus thousands of pages of evidence.

Yelton wrote that far from being subjected "to the security of unemotional British Beefeater guards," they deserved consideration.

Yelton said he approved the two get-togethers to lessen the stress.

And he said that after some jurors requested that there be beer there, he bought them some with his own money.

Yelton gave no credence to Baldwin's attempt to portray fellow juror Beverly Chapman as drunk after one court session at the end of the trial. Wrote Yelton, "None of the other . . . jurors described her as over-indulgent."

No one alleges jurors drank at the courthouse. And Yelton said there is no credible evidence any juror drank to intoxication during their off-hours.

All 11 other jurors have filed sworn statements denying excessive drinking. They also denied seeing any juror drunk.

Among the key defense allegations was that some jurors drank after deliberations had begun Oct. 14.

For example, Baldwin claimed juror James Christensen said he drank 11 beers one night at the hotel where the jurors stayed. In fact, Christensen said only that he felt like drinking 11 beers, Yelton wrote. Christensen said he drank no alcohol once deliberations began.

Yelton did note one juror who drank alcohol after the case went to the jury: Baldwin.

Yelton said she admitted drinking two beers at the hotel.

For that the judge did not fault her.

"Perhaps other jurors could obtain replenishing sleep by prayer and meditation. Others may exercise before retiring," Yelton wrote, adding that if Baldwin required two beers to help her sleep, "then so be it."

But on point after point of her allegations, Yelton found Baldwin not credible.

For example, there was Baldwin's understanding that the jury foreman's wife was a novelist who planned to write a book about the trial.

While the wife is an author, Yelton said, she never planned to write about the trial.

Yelton also denied Baldwin's assertion that jurors improperly talked about the case during the trial.

Yelton conceded there probably were comments made in the jury room or at the hotel about attorneys on both sides.

But he said alleged comments about defense attorney I. Marshall Pinkus' "propensity to sweat" -- Yelton noted the courtroom was warm -- or conjecture about whether Deputy Prosecutor Nina Alexander's hair bun was real "hardly qualify as discussions about the case."

Gregory Lewis, a deputy state public defender now handling Majors' case, declined comment except to say the Majors' verdict will be appealed to the Indiana Supreme Court.

Majors was convicted in October of killing six patients at the former Vermillion County Hospital in Clinton, Ind.

In November, Yelton sentenced Majors to 360 years in prison.

Judge Ernest Yelton said there is no credible evidence any juror drank to excess during the Majors trial.

Majors sentenced to 360 years in prison for patients' deaths

November 15, 1999

BRAZIL, Ind. (Court TV) — Convicted of the murders of six patients and suspected in over 100 other deaths, former nurse Orville Lynn Majors will spend the rest of his life in prison.

An Indiana judge Monday sentenced Majors to 360 years in prison for killing six patients who died while in his care at Vermillion County Hospital.

Judge Ernest Yelton condemned Majors for the diabolical nature of the killings committed while he worked at Vermillion between 1993 and 1995. He imposed six 60-year sentences to be served consecutively. Majors would have to serve at least 180 years before being eligible for early release.

"It is the judgment of this court that the maximum penalty is the minimally reasonable sentence in this case," Yelton said.

Last month, an Indiana jury found Majors guilty of murder. Majors was on trial for killing seven patients, but jurors were unable to reach a verdict on the seventh patient.

Majors continues to maintain his innocence, and his lawyers are planning to appeal his conviction. Majors was accused of giving the following patients lethal doses of potassium chloride and epinephrine: Mary Ann Alderson, 69; Dorothea Hixon, 80; Cecil Smith, 74; Luella Hopkins, 89; Margaret Hornick, 79; Freddie Wilson, 56; and Derek Maxwell, Sr., 64. While jurors were able to reach a decision in six of the cases, jurors were hopelessly deadlocked in Smith's case and Special Judge Ernest Yelton declared a mistrial on that charge.

During the six-week trial, Majors' defense attempted to cast reasonable doubt on the prosecution's case. Majors' lawyer, I. Marshall Pinkus called the patients' family physicians, who all testified that the alleged victims suffered from serious, preexisting illnesses at the time of their deaths and likely died from those diseases or natural causes.

These physicians, Pinkus argued, knew the seven patients the best and gave jurors a detailed history of the health of each alleged victim. Through the doctors' testimony, Pinkus was able to show jurors how Dorothea Hixon had been hospitalized on 20 different occasions for congestive heart failure in the two years leading up to her death; that Mary Ann Alderson had long suffered from chronic lung disease; that Derek Maxwell, Sr. was a diabetes patient who did not always follow his doctor's advice.

Pinkus also suggested that police unfairly focused on Majors and not other doctors and nurses who had contact with the patients. He had the lead investigator in the case, Detective Frank Turchi, admit on the stand that he performed a background check on Majors but not the defendant's colleagues. Turchi also admitted that his investigators requested blood and fingerprint samples only from Majors, but not from other people who came in contact with the patients.

The defense also was helped by a pretrial ruling that restricted the prosecution's use of an incriminating report that linked Majors to the deaths. An independent report by one of Majors' former nursing supervisors, Dawn Stirek, concluded that most of the patients died suddenly and unexpectedly and that patients were 42.96 times more likely to die during Majors' shift.

Before Majors, a one-time licensed practical nurse, joined Vermillion County Hospital in 1993, only 26 people died per year in the intensive care unit. But after his arrival, the death rate skyrocketed, reaching 101 in 1994. In just six months, between July and December 1994, 67 people died; 63 of those people died during Majors' shift. In Majors' 22-month tenure at Vermillion, 147 patients died in the ICU; 121 died during hours worked by Majors. After Majors' nursing license was suspended and he left the hospital, Vermillion's death rate went back to normal.

Before and during the trial, Judge Yelton restricted the prosecution's use of the study, siding with defense attorneys who claimed it would unfairly implicate Majors in the alleged murders of patients other than the seven victims. Judge Yelton ruled that prosecutors could not refer to specific statistics in the study but could mention it very generally.

Ultimately, the study did not have an impact on the outcome of the case. Prosecutors presented compelling evidence that suggested Majors' presence during these patients' deaths was more than a coincidence. Three of the patients' relatives saw their loved ones die almost immediately after Majors gave them a shot.

The consistent pattern of the patient's deaths also helped the prosecution's case. State medical examiners who exhumed and performed autopsies on the bodies told jurors that most of the patients experienced a sudden rise in their blood pressure before their hearts suddenly stopped. This, state medical experts believed, was consistent with excessive amounts of potassium and epinephrine being injected directly into an IV line.

In addition, investigators told jurors that they had recovered potassium vials and syringes in Majors' former residence and in a vehicle driven by the defendant.

The prosecution also cast doubt on the motives of hospital physicians who came to Majors' defense. When Drs. Joel Elias and John Albrecht, both of whom treated four of the deceased patients, maintained they had no reason to suspect Majors of any wrongdoing, prosecutor Nina Alexander pointed out that the doctors were the subject of a negligence suit filed by several patients' families. Since Majors' arrest in 1997, 65 families have filed suit against Vermillion County Hospital and several officials claiming that doctors were negligent in their supervision of Majors. As a licensed nurse, Majors was not legally authorized to give unsupervised injections. Majors' criminal acquittal, Alexander suggested, would help the doctors' pending cases.

Majors himself chose not to testify at trial, but his alleged words still convicted him. A former roommate, Andy Harris, told jurors that Majors often said that old people "should be gassed." Another acquaintance, Donald Miller, testified that in 1996 Majors admitted using potassium chloride to kill patients. However, the defense noted, Miller never told police about Majors' alleged confession until they approached the witness.

Killer Nurse Gets 360 Years

Gave Lethal Injections to Six Patients

Nov. 15, 1999

BRAZIL, Ind. (AP) -- A judge today sentenced former nurse Orville Lynn Majors to 360 years in prison for killing six elderly patients under his care with lethal injections.

Judge Ernest Yelton condemned Majors for the diabolical nature of the crime, committed in a hospital where the six victims had gone for treatment of various illnesses.

"It is the judgment of this court that the maximum penalty is the minimally reasonable sentence in this case," Yelton said, staring at Majors.

"At long last, may the souls of Mary Ann Alderson, Dorothea Dixon, Luella Hopkins, Freddie Dale Wilson, Derek Maxwell and Cecil Smith rest in peace," Yelton said.

Majors, 38, was convicted Oct. 17 of killing the six while they were patients at Vermillion County Hospital in Clinton in the mid 1990s.

He originally was charged with seven deaths, but jurors could not reach a decision on the seventh patient.

Majors sat a few feet from the witness stand, where three of the victims' relatives made emotional pleas for the longest possible sentence.

"Mr. Majors, if you don't want the fruit of sin, then stay out of the devil's orchard," said Maxwell's wife, Kathryn.

Defense attorney Carolyn Rader offered no evidence that might have lessened the sentence, saying she did not believe it would make a difference. She left immediately after the hearing without speaking to reporters.

Majors still maintains his innocence, and his lawyers are appealing the verdict.

Drugs found in home, van

The patients died over a 13-month span from 1993 to 1995. Majors had contended they died of the ailments that put them in the hospital.

Prosecutors said the deaths were consistent with injections of potassium chloride, epinephrine or both. Police found containers of those drugs at Majors' house and in his van.

With six murder convictions to his name, Majors will be the most prolific killer in the state's prison system.

Majors convicted of six of seven counts of murder in patients' deaths


October 18, 1999

BRAZIL, Ind. (Court TV) — After more than 40 hours of deliberations over three-and-half days, an Indiana jury Sunday found Orville Lynn Majors guilty of murder in six of the seven patients he was accused of killing. Jurors were unable to reach a verdict on the seventh patient.

Once a licensed practical nurse, Majors was on trial for killing seven patients who died while in his care when he worked at Vermillion County Hospital between 1993 and 1995. Majors was accused of giving the following patients lethal doses of potassium chloride and epinephrine: Mary Ann Alderson, 69; Dorothea Hixon, 80; Cecil Smith, 74; Luella Hopkins, 89; Margaret Hornick, 79; Freddie Wilson, 56; and Derek Maxwell, Sr., 64. While jurors were able to reach a decision in six of the cases, jurors were hopelessly deadlocked in Smith's case and Special Judge Ernest Yelton declared a mistrial on that charge.

Majors reportedly showed no emotion as the verdicts were read. While relatives of the victims hugged and praised the jury's decision, Majors' sister, Debbie McClelland, wandered around the courtroom afterwards, saying "They're wrong. ... Lynn never killed anybody."

Majors' attorney, I. Marshall Pinkus, vowed to appeal each conviction. Majors could face up to 65 years in prison on each count. His sentencing is scheduled for November 15.

During the six-week trial, Majors' defense attempted to cast reasonable doubt on the prosecution's case. Pinkus called the patients' family physicians, who all testified that the alleged victims suffered from serious, preexisting illnesses at the time of their deaths and likely died from those diseases or natural causes.

These physicians, Pinkus argued, knew the seven patients the best and gave jurors a detailed history of the health of each alleged victim. Through the doctors' testimony, Pinkus was able to show jurors how Dorothea Hixon had been hospitalized on 20 different occasions for congestive heart failure in the two years leading up to her death; that Mary Ann Alderson had long suffered from chronic lung disease; that Derek Maxwell, Sr. was a diabetes patient who did not always follow his doctor's advice.

Pinkus also suggested that police unfairly focused on Majors and not other doctors and nurses who had contact with the patients. He had the lead investigator in the case, Detective Frank Turchi, admit on the stand that he performed a background check on Majors but not the defendant's colleagues. Turchi also admitted that his investigators requested blood and fingerprint samples only from Majors, but not from other people who came in contact with the patients.

The defense also was helped by a pretrial ruling that restricted the prosecution's use of an incriminating report that linked Majors to the deaths. An independent report by one of Majors' former nursing supervisors, Dawn Stirek, concluded that most of the patients died suddenly and unexpectedly and that patients were 42.96 times more likely to die during Majors' shift.

Before Majors, a one-time licensed practical nurse, joined Vermillion County Hospital in 1993, only 26 people died per year in the intensive care unit. But after his arrival, the death rate skyrocketed, reaching 101 in 1994. In just six months, between July and December 1994, 67 people died; 63 of those people died during Majors' shift. In Majors' 22-month tenure at Vermillion, 147 patients died in the ICU; 121 died during hours worked by Majors. After Majors' nursing license was suspended and he left the hospital, Vermillion's death rate went back to normal.

Before and during the trial, Judge Yelton restricted the prosecution's use of the study, siding with defense attorneys who claimed it would unfairly implicate Majors in the alleged murders of patients other than the seven victims. Judge Yelton ruled that prosecutors could not refer to specific statistics in the study but could mention it very generally.

Ultimately, the report did not have a role in jurors' decision. The jury sided with prosecutors, who presented compelling evidence that suggested Majors' presence during these patients' deaths was more than a coincidence. Three of the patients' relatives saw their loved ones die almost immediately after Majors gave them a shot.

The consistent pattern of the patient's deaths also helped the prosecution's case. State medical examiners who exhumed and performed autopsies on the bodies told jurors that most of the patients experienced a sudden rise in their blood pressure before their hearts suddenly stopped. This, state medical experts believed, was consistent with excessive amounts of potassium and epinephrine being injected directly into an IV line.

In addition, investigators told jurors that they had recovered potassium vials and syringes in Majors' former residence and in a vehicle driven by the defendant.

The prosecution also cast doubt on the motives of hospital physicians who came to Majors' defense. When Drs. Joel Elias and John Albrecht, both of whom treated four of the deceased patients, maintained they had no reason to suspect Majors of any wrongdoing, prosecutor Nina Alexander pointed out that the doctors were the subject of a negligence suit filed by several patients' families. Since Majors' arrest in 1997, 65 families have filed suit against Vermillion County Hospital and several officials claiming that doctors were negligent in their supervision of Majors. As a licensed nurse, Majors was not legally authorized to give unsupervised injections. Majors' criminal acquittal, Alexander suggested, would help the doctors' pending cases.

Majors himself chose not to testify at trial, but his alleged words still convicted him. A former roommate, Andy Harris, told jurors that Majors often said that old people "should be gassed." Another acquaintance, Donald Miller, testified that in 1996 Majors admitted using potassium chloride to kill patients. However, the defense noted, Miller never told police about Majors' alleged confession until they approached the witness.

Jurors left the courtroom without commenting on the verdict. Paula Holdaway, daughter of victim Dorothea Hixon, felt vindicated and said, "Mother is now at peace."

A former nurse has been convicted of the murder of six of his patients in the United States.

October 18, 1999

Orville Lynn Majors poisoned his victims over a 13-month period at the Vermillion county hospital in Clinton, Indiana.

Jurors could not reach a verdict on a seventh count of murder.

Majors could now face life in prison.

Records show that he was linked to more than 100 deaths at the hospital.

Drugs discovered

Suspicions were first raised four years ago when a nursing supervisor noticed a steep rise in the death rate at the intensive care unit where Orville Lynn Majors worked.

The 38-year-old argued that the patients had died from natural causes, but the police said the deaths were the result of poisoning from injections of potassium chloride, epinephrine, or both.

Majors was present when all six patients died and often was alone in their company.

Containers of the drugs were discovered at his home and in his van.

During the five week trial, the jurors were prevented from seeing crucial hosptial records - they linked Majors to the deaths of as many as 130 people.

Nurse's Hospital Murder Trial Begins

August 30, 1999

CLINTON, Indiana (AP) -- On a chilly September dawn in 1995, police dug Russell Firestone Sr.'s body out of a rural cemetery.

The exhumation was part of an investigation into more than 100 suspicious deaths at Clinton's tiny hospital, where some nurses and doctors suspected a male nurse was killing patients.

Over the next four years, 14 more bodies were exhumed and the nurse, 37-year-old Orville Lynn Majors Jr., was charged with seven murders at Vermillion County Hospital. Majors is scheduled to go on trial today.

Russell Firestone Jr. hopes to find out what happened to his 73-year-old father -- even though the elder Firestone wasn't among the seven Majors is charged with killing.

'I want answers'

"I want some answers," said Firestone, a Clinton factory worker who told police a male nurse jabbed a syringe into his father's chest on Dec. 12, 1994, just moments before his death.

Prosecutors suspect Majors in dozens of patients' deaths, but they whittled the charges to the seven cases they believe exhibit the strongest evidence that Majors gave his patients unauthorized and lethal injections.

Majors says he's innocent of all charges -- official or implied. His lawyers say there is no evidence that any patients were murdered.

In 1994, the number of deaths skyrocketed at the 56-bed hospital, especially in the intensive care unit where Majors worked primarily.

Some days, every ICU patient died

In the four-bed ICU, 120 people died in 1994. Court records show that on some days Majors worked, every ICU patient died. But in each of the previous four years, no more than 31 ICU patients died.

A consultant who studied patient charts and nurses' time cards found patients were 43 times more likely to die when Majors was on duty.

Clay Circuit Court Judge Ernest Yelton barred prosecutors from using such data at trial, saying the state should stick to specific evidence of the seven murders.

Assistant prosecutor Nina Alexander said the state can prove its case without the statistical studies, although prosecutors haven't said what evidence they have beyond what's in the public case file.

Lethal injections alleged

In court documents, some relatives say they saw Majors give their loved ones shots before they died. And a team of doctors assembled by the Indiana State Police to review medical charts will testify the seven deaths are consistent with patients being injected with potassium chloride or epinephrine.

Police say vials containing traces of those drugs and syringes, which were found at Majors' home and in his van, were traced to shipments from medical suppliers to Vermillion County Hospital.

I. Marshall Pinkus, the court-appointed attorney who leads Majors' defense, says there is no evidence his client did anything wrong.

Pinkus says jurors won't find it unusual that nurses give patients shots or that sick, elderly patients die in intensive care units. Some patients and co-workers at the hospital considered Majors a hardworking and sympathetic nurse, Pinkus said.

Doctor believes Majors is innocent

John Albrect, the doctor in charge of the intensive care unit, has testified twice that he believes Majors is innocent.

Pinkus said state police were quick to follow rumors spurred by hospital workers who had jumped to the conclusion that Majors was killing patients because he happened to be on duty when they died.

Pinkus said prosecutors had rushed to judgment without pursuing other theories and suspects.

Close to 300 witnesses have been assembled for the case. The judge predicts it could take three months to present evidence to the 12 jurors and six alternates.



Indiana v. Orville Lynn Majors

Probable Cause Affidavit

On December 29, police arrested Orville Lynn Majors and charged the former male nurse with six murders allegedly committed while he was on duty at the Vermillion County Hospital in rural Clinton, Indiana.

Majors, 36 years old and openly bisexual in a conservative corner of a conservative state, had his nursing license suspended in 1995, but during almost two years form May 1993 to May 1995, he was on duty while 130 patients died at the small-town hospital.

In fact, during one year, almost one out of every three patients admitted died — and almost twice as many died on Majors' shift than on that of any other nurse. Majors insists he had nothing to do with it and that the figures — derived from exhaustive computer research — were high only because he worked so much overtime.

But Majors was told of the nascent investigation in 1995 when he was dismissed. And the details of the investigation against him show a different story: witness after witness saw Majors give mysterious injections to patients who died shortly after their visit from the heavyset nurse; misplaced vials of potassium chloride -- the almost untraceable chemical used in lethal injections; vials of that very chemical in a van owned by his parents.

Equally disturbing was what hospital employees told investigators about Majors' demeanor. As one patient cried for help, Majors commented, "Let the patient die." He called patients' families "whiners," "white trash" and "dirt," and said senior citizens were a "waste" and "should be gassed."

This is the affidavit that outlines the case put together by police against Majors. His trial was moved on January 21 to nearby Clay County after both sides agreed it should be held away from the location of the alleged killings.

At a pre-trial hearing on March 5, Special Judge Earnest Yelton chastised prosecutor Mark Greenly for submitting a preliminary witness list with some 700 potential witnesses.

Majors' attorney, I. Marshall Pinkus, told Court TV that the prosecution was casting too wide a net.

"A preliminary witness list is supposed to be filed in good faith to show the other side where you're going to go with discovery," he said. "A number of these people are people who know nothing about this."

Pinkus is also bringing in Indiana University law professor Henry Karlson to assist in the case.

"He's a big asset for us," said Pinkus, who said he has a trial strategy but declined to discuss it. "We know what we're going to do. That's going to unravel as time goes on. It'll become pretty clear, I think."

Another hearing is scheduled for early April, but no trial date has been set.

-Jon Bonné

STATE OF INDIANA
COUNTY OF VERMILLION

State of Indiana

Vs

Orville Lynn Majors Jr.

PROBABLE CAUSE

AFFIDAVIT

IN THE VERMILLION CIRCUIT COURT
CAUSE NO. 83C0 1-971 2-CF -0074

DEC 29 1997 Clerk Vermillion Circuit Court

Detective Frank Turchi with the Indiana State Police, having affirmed under the penalty of perjury, says that:

He is a detective with The Indiana State Police Department having been a member of that department for 23 years. That he hereby makes this affidavit for the purposes of establishing probable cause for the issuance of an arrest warrant for Orville Lynn Majors Jr., DOB: 4/24/61, for multiple counts of homicide more fully set forth below. He believes and has probable cause to suspect that Orville Lynn Majors Jr., (hereinafter referred to as Majors), while employed as a licensed practical nurse at the Vermillion County Hospital in Clinton, Indiana, did knowingly kill certain human beings in violation of IC 35-42-1-1 (1). In support of his belief that probable cause exists for the issuance of an arrest warrant for Majors, your Affiant would show the court that:

On or about March 8th, 1995, he was contacted by Chief Jerry Stateler of the Clinton Police Department and asked to meet with attorney Joe Beardsley, the attorney for the Vermillion County Hospital, and John Ling, the hospital administrator. He met with these individuals on two occasions. The information presented to your Affiant at these meetings established that Dawn Stirek, the Director of the Intensive Care Unit for the Vermillion County Hospital, had conducted a study (apparently on her own initiative) for purposes of investigating the abnormal mortality rate present in the Intensive Care Unit. A mortality summary for the Vermillion County Hospital, prepared by Stirek, established that historically there had been the following number of deaths in the Intensive Care Unit:

1990 - 29
1991 - 24
1992 - 25
1993 - 31
1994 - 101

The total admissions for the hospital during the above time period were:

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994

394 324 356 341 351

The study that Stirek performed concluded that one particular nurse, Majors, was inordinately associated with a higher number of codes and or deaths for the time period covered by her study. The Stirek study further set forth the respective nurses on duty and the hours they worked and the deaths or codes per hour worked by each nurse. The results were as follows (.Lynn. refers to Majors):

1994 - (Full year)

EMPLOYEE WORKED CODES OR/ CODES/ HOURS DEATHS PER HOUR

Andrea

Jennifer 140.8 0 0.0

Lynn 1,614.4 79 20.4

Sharon 1,975.8 49 40.3

Marilyn 1,447.8 15 98.5

Marty 2,002.5 17 117.8

Debbie 1,440.0 5 288.0

Linda 1,803.1 5 320.6

Maureen 1,061.1 3 353.7

Bill 2,291.1 6 381.9

Jane 1,862.7 4 465.7

Mary Ann 990.8 2 495.4

Average 1,433.7 16.8 234.6

1993 (4/1/93 - 12/31/93)

Debbie B.

Andrea

Lynn 837.9 20 41.9

Marilyn 958.8 13 73.8

Maureen 435.1 3 145.0

Mary Ann 1,756.4 7 250.9

Jane 1,281.6 4 320.4

Jennifer 761.2 2 380.6

Debbie H. 1,018.4 2 509.2

Linda 1,070.3 2 535.2

Sharon 1,110.9 2 555.4

Marty 1,295.0 1 1,295.0

Average 1,052.6 5.6 410.7

Note:

1. Worked hours taken from P/R registers. Does not include benefit hours, such as vacation, sick or holiday.

Based upon the association between the occurrence of excess mortality in the presence of a particular nurse, (Majors), the Indiana State Police undertook a massive investigation. The investigation attempted to determine whether or not the mortality rate was, in fact, excessive and to further determine whether or not the excess mortality rate could be attributed to criminal acts. Several detectives were assigned to the investigation and medical specialists were asked to review patient charts. An office was established in Clinton to provide a base for this investigation.

The medical specialists who assisted the investigators were:

Dr. Michael Olinger: Director of the Emergency Medicine and Trauma Center, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana

Dr. John A. Heidingsfelder: Forensic Pathologist, Evansville, Indiana

Dr. Mark M. LeVaguhn: Forensic Pathologist, Regional Medical Center, Department of Pathology Madison, Kentucky

Dr. Brent Furbee: Poison Center, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana

Dr. Roland B. McGrath: Intensivist, Wishard Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana

Dr. Eric Prystowsky: Electrophysiologist, Northside Cardiology, Indianapolis, Indiana Betsy Fields, RN, BSN: Jamestown, Indiana

Dr. Michael Evans: Toxicologist: AIT Laboratories, Indianapolis, Indiana

Certain materials were also reviewed by:

Dr. Bruce Waller: Cardiac Pathologist, Nasser, Smith and Pinkerton, Indianapolis, Indiana.

And Dr. Michael J. Buran: Director of the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana.

In addition to the aforesaid medical specialists, an independent Epidemiology study was commissioned by the investigative team. Dr. Steven Lamm of Washington, DC conducted this study. A copy of the report prepared by Dr. Steven Lamm is attached as exhibit A to this affidavit.

After reviewing patient files and records from 1991 to 1996, Dr. Lamm's conclusions are as follows:

1. The mortality at the Vermillion County Hospital reached epidemic proportions from July, 1994 through December, 1994.

2. The increased mortality occurred in the Intensive care Unit.

3. One Intensive Care Unit nurse was uniquely and very strongly associated with that mortality.

4. No other service or service provider shows any association that even approximates in magnitude that of the ICU nurse.

As part of his analysis, Dr. Lamm also concluded that certain alternative causative factors could be discounted. Specifically, the age of the patient population, the number of admissions, and the severity of illness of the patient population could not account for the excess mortality.

After receiving the Lamm study, the investigators obtained the employee code information which established that nurse 133 identified in the study is, in fact, Majors. Based upon the odds ratio set forth on appendix A in the study, it was concluded that if Majors were working on a particular day, the likelihood of someone dying in the Intensive Care Unit was 42.96 times greater than it would be if he were not working.

Investigation of hospital records revealed that during the epidemic period (July through December 1994) 67 (sixty-seven) people died in the Intensive Care Unit, and Majors was working when 63 of these patients died.

The information independently generated by the investigators concerning the correlation between Majors and those who died in the ICU Unit during the (22) twenty-two month period that he was employed established that Majors worked 2,795.2 hours or 15% of the total hours worked. One hundred and twenty-one 121 people died in the Intensive Care Unit during the hours worked by Majors during the twenty-two (22) month period. Twenty-six (26) people died in the Intensive Care Unit during the hours not worked by Majors.

From March 1, 1993 to March 31, 1995, (the dates of Majors employment), a death occurred every 23.1 hours that Majors was working. When he was not working (during the same period of time) one death occurred every 551.6 hours.

During the epidemic period identified by Dr. Lamm the investigators determined from a review of the medical records that in July of 1994 there were ten (10) deaths in the Intensive Care Unit. Nine (9) of these deaths occurred while Majors was working.

For the month of July, Majors worked 173.2 hours; one person died for every 19.24 hours while he was working. During the 570.8 hours in the month of July when Majors was not working, only one person died.

In August of 1994, there were ten (10) deaths in the Intensive Care Unit, and Majors was working when all ten (10) deaths occurred. He worked 182.1 hours for that month. A person died every 18.21 hours that he worked. No one died during the 561 hours that he was not working.

For September, 1994, there were twelve 12 deaths in the Intensive Care Unit and Majors was working for each of these deaths. During that month he worked 183.3 hours and did not work 536.7 hours. A person died every 15.27 hours that Majors worked. While he was not working, a death occurred every 536.7 hours.

In October of 1994, there were fourteen 14 deaths in the Intensive Care Unit.

Thirteen 13 deaths occurred on Majors' shift. He worked 199.7 hours and did not work 544.3 hours. A death therefore occurred every 15.36 hours while he was working.

When he was not working, a death occurred every 544.3 hours.

In November of 1994, there were nine 9 deaths in the Intensive Care Unit eight 8 while Majors was working. He worked 153.8 hours and did not work 566.2 hours. While n Majors was working, there was one 1 death every 19.2 hours and when he was not working there was one 1 death every 566.2 hours.

For December of 1994, there were fourteen 14 deaths in the Intensive Care Unit and Majors was working for all fourteen 14 deaths. He worked 151.0 hours and did not work 593.0 hours. A death occurred every 10.82 hours while Majors was working. When he was not working, no one died.

Other information generated by the investigators pertaining to Major's presence and circumstances surrounding deaths in the Intensive Care Unit revealed that it was common knowledge that the deaths occurred while Majors was working. Marilyn Alexander, a nurse in the Intensive Care Unit, reported to your investigators that she first became aware in October, 1993, of the increasing death rate and began tracking on her personal calendar the number of deaths. She stopped in 1994 when she no longer was assigned to work with Majors. The investigators learned from nurse Debbie Sollars that on October 11, 1994, she approached Judy Howard, the Director of Nursing, stating that she was concerned about the death rate in the Intensive Care Unit. Nurse Bill Balla, another nurse, reported to your investigators that he reviewed the Intensive Care Unit log in December of 1994 and found that deaths occurred during Majors' shift. He found that 86% of the people died when Majors was working. There was no discernible pattern with regards to the schedules of the other nurses.

Investigators learned that Sharon Calvert, a nurse in the unit, went to Dr. Elias in December of 1994 questioning her own ability because a large number of patients were dying when she was working. She further stated that she found it unusual that patients who were dying had respiratory arrest then an arrhythmia. Based upon her nursing experience, she felt that it should be the reverse.

Nurse Martha Starkey stated to the investigators that the subject of the increase in deaths was a matter that people joked about and that Majors was the focus of the attention concerning these deaths. Marjorie Frye, an Emergency Room Medical Technician, noticed that the deaths followed Majors' shift. She noticed this because she worked the same shift as Majors.

Thomas Della-Penna, an X-ray Technician, stated to the investigators that he noticed codes on weekends and around shift changes when Majors was working. Patty Wilson, a nurse, told investigators that several patients were fine when she left her shift only to return to her next shift and discover that they had died when Majors was working. Martha Starkey indicated to the investigators that when Majors' shift changed to the weekends, the deaths followed him accordingly. She further told the investigators that patient in her 70's or 80's in room 223. She left for five minutes to get another unit of blood. She returned finding Majors coming out of the room stating that the patient had just died. She additionally remembered another female patient who had died after the shift change. According to Starkey she was holding steady. when Majors came out of the room and stated She's dead.

Nurse Jane Garrison told Nurse Sharon Calvert that the nurses on the night shift were making bets as to who would die the next day when Majors was working. Calvert further stated to the investigators that many of her patients in ICU would die when she went to lunch and Majors was in the ICU unit working alone.

The investigators learned from hospital personnel that Majors was often left alone and unsupervised in the Intensive Care Unit. Nurse Joann Powell stated that she observed Majors as the only nurse in the ICU several times in February and March of 1995. Kathy Clouse, the Medical Surgical Secretary, stated that Majors worked alone in ICU on many occasions. Dawn Stirek, Maureen Love, Karen Sue Cox and Nadine Shonk confirmed this. Nadine Shonk further told the investigators that Judy Howard and Dawn Stirek told her that Majors needed no direct supervision.

Patty Young, a licensed practical nurse, also stated that Majors often worked alone in ICU. Marlene Carlson, an employee, noticed that Majors was alone when she would deliver food trays. Judy Howard stated that Majors was occasionally left alone when other nurses went to lunch. Jackie Donald noticed that Majors worked alone in ICU. She further stated that, in fact, Majors was scheduled to be alone for certain shifts. Amy Krabel, a nurse's aide, saw him alone in ICU. Judith Wagle, a licensed practical nurse, saw him alone in ICU. Cindy Nicoson, a RN, saw him alone in ICU. Marty Brown also stated that there were times when Majors was working alone in the Intensive Care Unit. Jane Garrison also saw Majors work alone and administer medications in the Intensive Care Unit.

The investigators further learned that in July of 1994, the beginning of the epidemic period, Majors underwent a personality change. Sharon Calvert and Marty Brown told the investigators that they noticed such a personality change in that Majors began to be much more irritable. He would become wild-eyed and almost uncontrollably irate. This especially true when he felt that things did not go his way or someone criticized him.

Contemporaneous with the information developed by the investigators, the medical specialists reviewed one hundred and sixty-five (165) patient charts. These charts consisted of one hundred and forty-seven (147) patients who died in the Intensive Care Unit during the twenty-two 22 month period Majors was employed. There were added to this group certain charts of patients who died in the Medical/Surgical Unit of the hospital if the investigators believed they were suspicious.

The medical team identified certain patterns in the deaths of those people who died while Majors was working. These patterns fall within two categories.

They are:

1. The pattern denoted by the widening of the QRS complex as exhibited on the electrocardiograph (EKG) strips.

2. The pattern denoted by the manifestation of hypertension tachycardia where patients with no previous history of high blood pressure suddenly, without explanation, experience a dramatic increase in blood pressure.

The medical team further noticed that many patients who died in the Intensive Care Unit, while Majors was working, died suddenly and unexpectedly. Several cases involved situations where a patient was doing fine, improving, or otherwise stable, then, suddenly died. Furthermore, the twenty-six (26) people who died in the Intensive Care Unit when Majors was not working, did not exhibit the same characteristics of those patients who died while Majors was working. Those who died while Majors was not working exhibited, among other things, progressive hypotension and not a sudden rise of blood pressure or a widening of the QRS complex.

Your Affiant learned from the medical experts that the widening of the QRS complex was particularly significant for purposes of understanding the circumstances surrounding the phenomena of sudden deaths in ICU during the period in question. Your Affiant further was told that the electrocardiogram (EKG) is a useful clinical tool for the recognition of electrolyte imbalance especially in relation to potassium. The condition known as hyperkalemia, or the presence of excessive amounts of potassium in the blood, has certain particular EKG signs. These are tall, narrow, and peaked T waves, decrease of the amplitude of the P wave or an absent P wave and a widening of the QRS complex. As the serum level of potassium increases the QRS complex becomes prolonged or widened. This is especially true when the serum potassium concentration exceeds 6.5 milliequivalents per liter.

Excessive amounts of potassium would, in the opinion of Dr. Eric Prystowski, account for the suppression of electrical activity in the heart. This can cause sudden death. This can be detected by the widening QRS pattern on the EKG strips. It was, therefore, the opinion of the medical team, that certain deaths could be explained by an injection of a substance into that particular patient that would suppress the conduction of electricity by the heart. Potassium would cause this condition when injected, in an undiluted form, directly into an IV line.

According to the medical experts, the pattern denoted by hypertension tachycardia is consistent with the exogenous administration of a catechcholamine. Such a catechcholamine is epinephrine and the hypertension tachycardia pattern is consistent with the injection of a substance like epinephrine into a particular patient.

This would be manifested by a sudden or unexplained rise in a patient's blood pressure.

The investigators also acquired information pertaining to Majors' unauthorized use of medications and injections. He was also found to be in possession of potassium and epinephrine containers outside the hospital environment.

Mr. Tony Towell, a heating and cooling businessman from Jasonville, told investigators that Orville Lynn Majors Jr. offered for sale a drug represented to be powerful stuff., a serious drug., 1995 while he was : that he got the drug a heart stimulant. on January 26, while installing a new furnace at Fin & Feathers, a business owned by Majors. Majors told Towell told Towell that he got the drug from the pharmacy where it took several signatures to get it and that it had to be administered in front of somebody. Majors further told Towell that it could be mixed with crank. Towell said the drug Majors showed him was in a clear vial, with a clear liquid inside, approximately 2. long and 1/4. in diameter. Towell said Majors appeared to be ·high. on drugs at the time of this attempted drug sale.

Mr. Charles L. Gabbard, a co-worker of Tony Towell, told investigators that he heard and observed the conversation between Majors and Towell on 1-26-95 while assisting with the installation of a new furnace at Majors business. Gabbard said he carried tools to the truck and Towell came to the truck and told him Majors was trying to sell him heart stimulant and that it would speed you up.

As above mentioned, the investigators found evidence that Majors had in his possession, outside the hospital, the very types of drugs, (potassium and epinephrine), that could account for the two patterns of patient deaths. A statement was given to the police by Andrew Harris who lived with Majors at a residence located on County Road 800 North, in Greene County, Indiana. Harris and Majors lived together from 1987 to 12/95 at various addresses. Harris was also an employee at the hospital. Harris told the investigators he observed an empty potassium chloride container in a seat console of the car that Majors was driving during the summer of 1993 or 1994. He also reported that he saw an empty bottle of potassium chloride in the garage at their residence in December, 1995. It was in a box of papers that was on the garage floor. He identified these potassium containers as the same type that were used at the Vermillion County Hospital. Harris stated that he never carried such items from the hospital.

Majors and Harris ceased living together in December of 1995. The house titled in Harris' name was abandoned and became the subject of a foreclosure action. On October 3, of 1996, Harris executed a consent so that the investigators could search the residence. This search occurred on October 3, of 1996. The investigators returned on October 15, 1996, to further search the garbage and trash area. (They were unable to perform this part of the search in the previous visit because this area was infested by bees and required special equipment to conduct).

Several empty and several partially full containers of potassium chloride were recovered in these two searches. These items were found among numerous personal items belonging to Majors. The items recovered include the following:

1) Indiana State Police evidence item number 156 is a vial of potassium chloride. The vial is a 20 ML/40 mEq and contains approximately 1/4 inch of fluid. The vial has an identification lot # 390717 and an expiration date of 6/30/91. This vial of potassium chloride was manufactured by Lyphomed Laboratories, Deerfield, IL and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

2) Indiana State Police evidence item 182 is a vial of potassium chloride. The vial is a 20 ML/40 mEq and containing a trace of fluid. The vial has an Identification lot # 330293 and an expiration date of 4/95. This vial of potassium chloride was manufactured by Lyphomed Laboratories and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

3) Indiana State Police evidence item number 188 is a 20 ML/40 mEq container of Potassium Chloride. Empty, with an identification lot # 330293 and an expiration date of 4/95. Manufactured by Lyphomed Laboratories and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

4) Indiana State Police Evidence Item number 191 is a 20 ML/40 mEq container of Potassium Chloride. 1/2 full with an identification lot # 300071 and expiration date of 1/30/92. Manufactured by Lyphomed Laboratories and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

5) Indiana State Police evidence item number 215 is a 20ML/mEq container of potassium chloride with traces of fluid lot number and expiration not discernible. Manufactured by Lyphomed Laboratories. This vial is not traceable due to the absence of a lot and expiration date.

6) Indiana State Police evidence item number 158 is a 20 ML/40 mEq container of potassium chloride with traces of fluid with an identification Lot # 27789DK and an expiration date 4/1/91. Manufactured by Abbott Laboratories. No records were available to further trace this item.

7) Indiana State Police evidence item number 178 is an empty plastic bag labeled 20 Ml/40 mEq with ·ER Stock Return to Pharmacy. upon it. This plastic bag was a bag used by the Vermillion County Hospital pharmacy to place drugs throughout the hospital to track their inventory. A positive ID was made by Vermillion County pharmacy employees Dale Resch and Patty Yates with regards to the fact that this bag came from Vermillion County Hospital.

8) Indiana State Police evidence item number 190 an empty plastic bag labeled 20 ML/40 mEq also containing the words ICCU Stock Return to Pharmacy. this bag once contained a vial of potassium chloride. This bag was identified as belonging to Vermillion County Hospital.

9) Indiana State Police evidence item number 179 is a empty cardboard box which is labeled epinephrine inj. (injectable), 1:10,000, 1 mg (0.1 mg/ml) Identification lot # 78384R1 and expiration date 4/1/95. Manufactured by Abbot Laboratories who were suppliers to Vermillion County Hospital.

10) Indiana State Police evidence item number 180 is an empty cardboard box which is labeled epinephrine inj. (injectable), 1:10,000, 1 mg (0.1 mg/ml) identification lot # 78384R1 and an expiration date 4/1/95 manufactured by Abbott Laboratories who were suppliers to Vermillion County Hospital.

11) Investigators also recovered several items of Alupent. These are: Indiana State Police evidence item numbers 161, 162, 163, 177, 192, 193, 198. These items were traced to Boehringer/Ingelheim Pharmacy in Ridgefield, Connecticut who supplied Bergen/Brunswig who supplied such items to Vermillion County Hospital.

12) Indiana State Police evidence item number 164 is a container of Nitroglycerin injection 50mg/10 ML with a trace of fluid, with identification lot # 190155 and an expiration date 9/90. This vial of nitroglycerin was manufactured by Lyphomed and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

13) Indiana State Police evidence item number 194 is a container of Nitroglycerin injection 50mg/10 ML with a trace of fluid, with identification lot # 190155 and an expiration date 9/90. This vial of nitroglycerin was manufactured by Lyphomed and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

14) Indiana State Police evidence item number 204 is an empty plastic bag labeled Nitroglycerin 50 mg/10 ML inj. (injectable), ·ICCU Stock Return to Pharmacy. This bag was identified as belonging to Vermillion County Hospital.

15) Indiana State Police evidence item numbers: 166,183, 184, 195, 196 and 218 are vials of Proventil containing different amounts of fluid. They are all manufactured by Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, New Jersey. Item numbers 166, 183, 195, 196 and 218 were not traceable. Item number 184, a 20-ML container of Proventil identification lot # 2KPJ22 and an expiration date 9/95 was traceable by the lot number to a wholesale distributor who supplied the Vermillion County Hospital.

16) Indiana State Police evidence item number 159 is a 1/2 full vial of Bronkosol 10 ML with an identification lot # B008CF expiration date 6/90. Manufactured by Winthrop/Breon Pharmaceutical, New York, New York who supplied Vermillion County Hospital although the records on this lot are not available.

17) Indiana State Police evidence item number 160 is a 1/4 full vial of Bronkosol 10 ML with an identification lot # B008CF expiration date 6/90. Manufactured by Winthrop/Breon Pharmaceutical.

18) Indiana State Police evidence item 157 is a 1/2 full 20 ML vial of Ventolin with identification lot # 6BGD2 and an expiration date of 1/89. Manufactured by Glaxco Wellcome Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied Vermillion County Hospital.

19) Indiana State Police evidence item number 189 is an empty plastic bag labeled ·1 ICCU Stock Dobutamine 250 mg/10ml vial (Dobutrex) start 01/07/91 stop, 612-01, Return to Pharmacy. This plastic bag was identified as belonging to the Vermillion County Hospital.

20) Indiana State Police evidence item number 169 is a individually wrapped Ledercillin VX Penicillin V potassium tablet. 500 mg with a identification lot # BC221896 and expiration date 12/89. Manufactured by Lederle Laboratories, Wayne, New Jersey. Indiana State Police evidence item number 167 is a purple stopper vacutainer. An expiration date 1/95. Manufactured by Becton/Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, New Jersey.

21) Indiana State Police evidence item number 170 is a purple stopper vacutainer with a trace of fluid. Identification lot # 2M811 and an expiration date 7/94. Manufactured by Becton Dickison and units of this lot number were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied to Vermillion County Hospital.

23) Indiana State Police evidence item number 174 is a sealed package containing a syringe needle 25 G, 5/8. Product # 305122. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

24) Indiana State Police evidence item number 173 is an empty red stopper vacutainer. Identification # 64952E057 and an expiration date of 6/94. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

25) Indiana State Police evidence item number 171 is a blue stopper vacutainer with a trace of fluid. Identification # 6418-3A073 and expiration date 7/94. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

26) Indiana State Police evidence item number 172 is a blue stopper vacutainer with a trace of fluid. Identification # 6418-3A073 and expiration date 7/94 Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

27) Indiana State Police evidence item number 187 is a sealed package containing a syringe needle 25 G, 5/8. Product # 305122. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

28) Indiana State Police evidence item number 185A is eleven vacutainers, EDTAK 3. Identification lot # 4B168 and expiration date 2/96. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson. Unit lot numbers were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplied Vermillion County Hospital.

29) Indiana State Police evidence item number 185 B is nine activators. Identification lot # 4D905 and an expiration date 3/95. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson. Units' lot numbers were shipped to wholesale distributors who supplies Vermillion County Hospital.

30) Indiana State Police evidence item number 185 C is fifteen activators. Identification lot # 4G901 and an expiration date 6/95. Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

31) Indiana State Police evidence item number 186 one bottle of Providine iodine prep. One bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide. Manufactured by Baxter Health Care, Deerfield, Michigan.

32) Indiana State Police evidence item number 217 is a prescription bottle with an unreadable label which contains eleven pills.

33) Indiana State Police evidence item number 219 and 220 are two blue stopper vacutainers with a trace of fluid. Labeling not legible.

34) Indiana State Police evidence item number 168 is a vacutainer needle. Product # 21GX12J009.

35) Indiana State Police evidence item number 221 A are five vacutainer needles. Product # 21GX148014.

36) Indiana State Police evidence item number 221B is three blue stopper vacutainers. Identification lot # 64183A073 and an expiration date 7/94. One of these tubes has the name ·Louise Harrold 6/7/94. (This was determined to be a patient Orville Lynn Majors Jr. visited while working for Regional Hospital Home Health Care). Manufactured by Becton Dickinson.

37) Indiana State Police evidence item 222 is a plastic syringe, chewed on.

38) Indiana State Police item 223, 224 and 225 are vacutainer needles.

39) Indiana State Police evidence item number 228 is a Hemostat.

40) Indiana State Police evidence item number 229 is a piston of a syringe.

41) Indiana State Police evidence item number 230 is a Mosby handbook of Pharmacology.

42) Indiana State Police evidence item number 205 is a Nurses Drug Handbook.

43) Indiana State Police evidence item number 231 is a needle and cap.

44) Indiana State Police evidence item number 232 is a needle and cap.

AIT Laboratories of Indianapolis, Indiana, analyzed the fluid contained in the bottles or containers labeled potassium chloride.. The test results confirmed that potassium chloride in an undiluted concentration was, in fact, present in those respective bottles.

On April 18, 1997, based on information supplied to the investigators by Jason Crynes, Majors' nephew, a search warrant was obtained for a 1985 Chevy van owned by Orville Majors and Anna Bell Majors, the parents of Majors. Crynes saw containers of potassium in this van several months prior to this date. His parents signed a consent for purposes of searching this van. Three (3) containers of potassium chloride were recovered. These are items 259G, 259H and 260L. Lyphomed who supplied to Bergen/Brunswig who supplies such items to Vermillion County Hospital manufactured each. These were 40 milliequivalent bottles that contained potassium chloride. One was 1/2 full (260L) and the other two had traces of fluid.

According to Harris, Majors used this van when his car was disabled. This occurred while Majors was working at the Vermillion County Hospital. Harris further told the investigators that he (Harris) never brought potassium chloride bottles home from the hospital during the period of time he was living with Majors and working at the hospital.

Hospital personnel stated to the investigators that there is no reason for these containers to be outside the hospital environment. The investigators learned from nurse Maureen Love that when a portion of potassium chloride is used from a container, such as those recovered from the Majors' van and residence, the rest is thrown into the trash. There is no documentation for the potassium chloride thrown away; nor are there any accounting procedures for the wasted potassium chloride. The potassium chloride from these containers is to be mixed with other fluids for the purpose of being put into a bag supplying an IV. It is not to be used in its undiluted form because it would be very dangerous to the patient.

Nurse Jackie Donald also told the investigators there was no accounting for unused potassium chloride as it was thrown away and no paperwork generated.

In an effort to determine how many times the containers of potassium chloride, recovered by the investigators had been used, the Indiana State Police Laboratory conducted an examination of the stoppers of said potassium containers. Visual and microscopic examination in item 158 revealed a minimum of five (5) needle punctures readily apparent in the top and bottom of the stopper. Visual and microscopic examination of the rubber stopper in item 191 revealed a minimum of eight (8) needle puncture sites readily apparent on the top and bottom of the stopper. Visual and microscopic examination of rubber stoppers on items 215 and 259G revealed a minimum of four (4) needle puncture sites readily apparent in the top and bottom of the stoppers. Visual and microscopic examination of the rubber stopper in item 259H revealed a minimum of two (2) needle punctures sites readily apparent from the top and bottom of the stopper. Visual and microscopic examination of the rubber stoppers in item 260L revealed a minimum of one (1) needle puncture site readily apparent from the top and bottom of the stopper.

Given the fact the normal hospital procedure would only call for one use of potassium chloride from a potassium chloride container with the remaining fluid thrown away, it is reasonable to conclude that multiple punctures in the rubber stoppers indicate that the fluid contained therein was accessed in a manner inconsistent with hospital policy and inconsistent with the normal manner in which this item or drug was used for purposes of servicing a patient.

Investigators further learned that potassium shortages were noticed at the hospital during the period of time Majors was employed. Nurse Bill Balla, who is responsible once a week to count the stock drugs in ICU, such as potassium chloride, noticed the potassium chloride was missing as well as was the epinephrine. Nadine Shonk told the investigators that potassium chloride was missing from the red night box during the period that she was working. Nadine Shonk also noticed shortages of drugs. She further stated that potassium chloride was missing from the night box on the Med/Surg and the pharmacy quit storing potassium chloride in the night box on the Med/Surg floor due to increased expense from having to re-supply the missing potassium chloride.

Phyllis Koszewski, a RN in the Emergency Room, informed the investigators that the stock drug care was lax and a person could walk away with a bottle of potassium chloride and not be detected. Judy Howard, the Nursing Director, further confirmed the nurses mixed their own potassium chloride solutions and there was no accountability of the unused portion. Ms. Howard positively identified the plastic bags, marked ICCU and E.R., as in fact, being from the hospital. These were the same bags that were recovered from Majors' residence.

Amy Krabel, a Respiratory Therapist, told the investigators that she had heard that numerous drugs were missing. Debbie Feller told investigators that ICU and ER had a problem of unaccountability with regards to their IV stock, which included valium and potassium chloride, between the years 1993 and 1995. Ms. Feller is a Pharmacy Technician at the hospital. Nurse Martha Starkey informed investigators that she would sometimes find a potassium container on an IV tray that wasn't supposed to be there.

Marsha Stinson, a cleaning lady, was responsible for cleaning a building in which Majors formerly had a business in Linton, Indiana. She uncovered a box of needles and syringes in a filing cabinet behind the bottom drawer and turned the items over to the Linton Police Department who provided them to the Indiana State Police.

Additional witnesses also reported seeing Orville Lynn Majors Jr. when he was in possession of syringes or needles in suspicious circumstances. Nurse Kathleen Warren observed Majors with a stock syringe, which was not accountable. Charles Corado observed Majors take a syringe apparatus out of a black bag and inject his father. This was not documented or charted. Investigators learned that Majors did carry a black pouch or bag containing syringes. This was confirmed by a friend of Majors, a former nurse named Connie Jones, who told investigators that Majors had syringes in a small black bag. Tamara Johnson, a friend of Majors, told investigators that she saw Majors having syringes still in the packages on his person and that he was furthermore using the same to inject methamphetamines.

Rhonda Culpepper, a housekeeper, saw Majors go into room 209 or 210 with a black pouch. She further told investigators that she witnessed Majors inject a female patient in bed number three 3 in the ICU unit and later (15 minutes) this patient died. She believes this event to have occurred in December of 1994. Stephanie Bollinger, a granddaughter of Rebecca Pugh, who died in ICU, acknowledged that she was given tranquilizers from Majors without Majors having obtained authorization to provide them to her.

Debbie Feller, a Pharmacy Technician, told the investigators that she had entered the ICU unit about suppertime in early 94 through the back door and saw Majors give an injection to a patient. He seemed startled and nervous when he saw her. There were no other nurses present.

Based upon the above information, and with addition of certain information which will be more fully developed below, your Affiant has probable cause to believe that Majors committed the crime of murder as defined in IC 3542-1-1 (1) in that he knowingly killed patients at the Vermillion County Hospital. Those patients include:

1) Mary Ann Alderson

2) Dorothea Hixon

3) Cecil Smith

4) Luella Hopkins

5) Margaret Hornick

6) Freddie Wilson

These patients will be addressed individually.

1) Mary Ann Alderson

Mary Ann Alderson was a female, 69 years of age. She entered the Vermillion County Hospital on November 5, 1994 at 2230 hrs. complaining of chest pains after consuming pizza and beer.

She died on November 7, 1994 at 1711 hrs.

Majors was working at the Vermillion County Hospital on November 7, 1994 at 0659 hrs. to 1900 hrs.

On November 6, 1994, at 0130 hrs. she was transferred to ICU on instructions from Dr. Elias. At 0955 hrs., the same date, an order was made to transfer her to the Med/Surg floor by Dr. Albrecht and to place her on telemetry. She was then transferred to room 220. At 2100 hrs., her status was denoted as being good.

On November 7, at 0100 hrs. she was evaluated as being okay. At 0100 hours. Ms. Alderson was charted as sleeping and breathing easily. At 1015 hrs. Nurse Judy Wagle stated that Alderson told her that she would go home the next day. Dr. Elias also noted that at 1025 hrs. everything seemed okay. Nurse Wagle noticed Alderson sitting on the side of her bed at 1510 hrs.. At approximately 1530 hrs., Alice Hensley, a friend, visited Mary Ann. Hensley stated Mary Ann was doing fine and was looking forward to going home. Alice left at approximately 1600 hrs.. At 1615 hrs. it was charted that Ms. Alderson had no complaints. Judy Wagle charts at 1620 hrs. Orville Lynn Majors Jr. started a saline lock. At 1625 hrs. Amy Clarkson, a nursing assistant was in Mary Ann's room and stated that she was doing fine.

Nurse Bill Balla told the investigators that Mary Ann was not in any distress and that she was going home. Nurse Nadine Shonk was also in Mary Ann's room, shortly before she died, and told the investigators that Mary Ann was doing fine. Mary Ann's niece, Nancy Sauer who was in the room shortly before the code was called, also corroborated this to the investigators. All these individuals had left before the code was called.

Just before the code, Amy Clarkson, stated that Majors left the nurses station and went out into the Med/Surg floor.

At 1640 hrs., a code was called by Majors. Nadine Shonk, who was on duty at the time, responded to the code and as she was hurrying upstairs towards Mary Ann's room, she was able to see into her room which was situated at the top of the stairs. She saw Majors cranking Mary Ann's bed down while holding a syringe in his left hand. Nurse Shonk told the investigators there was no reason for Orville Lynn Majors Jr. to have this syringe. Majors is left-handed.

At 1711 hrs. Mary Ann Alderson was pronounced dead.

Nurse Bill Balla told the investigators that everyone was surprised at Mary Ann's death. Dr. Elias told the investigators that he probably said that Mary Ann could go home and he was surprised she died. Nurse Connie Hoopingarner confirmed to the investigators that Alderson was to be discharged the following day.

An autopsy was conducted upon the body of Mary Ann Alderson by Dr. John A. Heidingsfelder. He noticed there was absent significant coronary atherosclerosis or coronary artery narrowing. There was nothing revealed in the autopsy that would account for the sudden death of Mary Ann Alderson. Her heart was not enlarged nor did it manifest any other defects that would account for the sudden death. There was no evidence of acute pulmonary disease. Dr. Bruce Waller, a cardiac pathologist, reviewed the slides prepared by Dr. Heidingsfelder of the heart tissue of Mary Ann Alderson. The examination revealed nothing that would account for the sudden death of Mary Ann Alderson.

It is the opinion of Dr. Eric Prystowsky that Mary Ann Alderson's death was not in the clinical course as presented by her underlying physical condition. Her death was sudden and unexpected. Dr. Prystowsky believes within a reasonable degree of medical certainty that Mary Ann Alderson died in a manner consistent with an injection of potassium. The remaining members of the medical team who examined Mary Ann's chart agree that her death was sudden, unexpected and not in the clinical course.

Your Affiant, therefore, has probable cause to believe that Majors knowingly killed Mary Ann Alderson, another human being.

2) Dorothea Hixon

Dorothea Hixon was an eighty (80) year old female who was admitted to the emergency room on April 23, 1994, at 1355 hrs..

Dorothea Hixon died on April 23, 1994 at 1708 hrs..

Majors was working at the Vermillion County Hospital on April 23, 1994 from 0701 hrs. to 1857 hrs.

Cindy Watson, a nurse in the emergency room did the initial assessment on Dorothea and felt that she was not in a bad condition when she arrived at the emergency room. Nurse Watson placed an IV in Dorothea's left hand and assessed her as stable. Dr. Ray Smith, the emergency room doctor, also noted that Dorothea was stable and in no immediate danger.

According to Dorothea's daughters, Betty Coonce and Paula Holdaway, who accompanied Dorothea to the hospital, this was a routine visit for purposes of alleviating an accumulation of fluid on Dorothea's lungs. Dorothea had been to the hospital before for this condition. So he could monitor her condition, Dr. Albrecht, her family physician ordered her to be transferred to the Intensive Care Unit.

Betty indicated to the investigators that Dorothea was not breathing rapidly upon her admission to the hospital. She believed that her respirations were 18-20 per minute.

The daughters accompanied her to the Intensive Care Unit and were asked to remain in a waiting area. Approximately thirty 30 minutes later a nurse, identified as Majors, approached the daughters and stated that there was a problem as Dorothea either had a massive heart attack or stroke. He stated to Betty that Dorothea was going into a coma and to come in and talk to her.

Betty went into the room and noticed Dorothea was coherent, talking and moving her arms and legs. Dorothea stated that she was not in any pain. Majors was on the right side of Dorothea and Betty asked him to go get her sister Paula. Neither Betty nor Paula ever saw any other nurses other than Majors in the ICU unit during the entire time Dorothea was in the unit. Paula came into the room and was standing on Dorothea's left side holding her hand and rubbing her arm. At that point she felt a hand coming under hers and turned to see Majors with a syringe making an injection into Dorothea's IV. Paula said Excuse me. and Majors patted Paula on the arm and said, "No you're all right honey. and removed the syringe after having injected its contents."

According to Paula, Majors then kissed Dorothea on the forehead, brushed her hair back, and said, "It's all right pumkin. Everything is going to be all right now pumkin."

Within sixty 60 seconds after Paula saw Majors make an injection into her mother, her mother rolled her eyes back and suddenly died.

Dorothea's treating physician Dr. Albrecht never ordered any injection or medication given to Dorothea. The changes in heart rhythm appearing on the EKG strips indicate that Dorothea's heart went from a state of rhythm to asystole (without rhythm) in one minute. This coincides with the temporal observations of the injection. These EKG changes are of the type consistent with those peculiar to a potassium overdose according to the expert medical opinion of Dr. Eric Prystowsky. Dorothea's EKG changes are consistent with a sudden suppression of the electrical activity of her heart.

The medical team also noted that during the 30-minute period that Majors was alone with Dorothea, her blood pressure suddenly and without explanation, spiked.

An autopsy was performed upon the body of Dorothea Hixon by Dr. Mark Levaughn. There were no organic conditions present that would account for the rhythm changes as observed on the EKG strips. There is no evidence of recent heart problems. There was some coronary disease but the coronary vessels were open. There was no evidence of any acute decrease in the blood flow.

There was nothing by way of the autopsy examination to account for the sudden cardiac standstill, a complete cessation of electrical activity that was manifested on the EKG strips.

Dr. Bruce Waller, the cardiac pathologist, did not discover any natural phenomena that would account for this sudden death.

Additionally Diane Tolliver, document examiner, reviewed the medical record known as the Initial Assessment for the Indiana State Police. She concluded that Majors did the initial assessment of Dorothea when she arrived at ICU and that the space denoting Dorothea's respiration rate was changed from 22 to 32 which was an alteration of Dorthea's medical record. This alteration made Dorothea's condition worse than, in fact, it was. The investigators discovered another incident where Majors falsely documented a patient's condition to reflect a worse condition than actually present. Carolyn Wilson, RN, stated that in reference to patient Paula Trina (an ICU death) Majors charted patient ·semi-conscious, speech slurred and color dusky. when in fact, Wilson stated that Paula Trina was alert, understood instructions and her speech was not slurred.

It is the opinion of those members of the medical review team who reviewed this chart that Dorothea Hixon's death was sudden, unexpected, and not in the clinical course.

Your Affiant, therefore, has probable cause to believe that Majors knowingly killed another human being to wit: Dorothea Hixon.

3) Cecil Smith

Cecil Smith was a seventy-four 74-year-old male who was admitted to the Vermillion County Hospital on April 2, 1994 at approximately 1420 hrs. with a diagnosis of pneumonia.

Cecil Smith died on April 3, 1994 at 1551 hrs..

Majors was working at the Vermillion County Hospital on April 3, 1994 from 0656 hrs. to 1718 hrs..

Mr. Smith was admitted to the Medical/Surgical unit of the hospital and complications began when attending to him.

On this particular day Majors was asked to assist a nurse's aide in bathing the Medical/Surgical patients and providing them with their medications. According to Patty Young, Majors threw a fit. when asked to give baths. Nurse Chris Hollenbeck reversed the tasks to calm Majors down. Accordingly Yvonne Grove, a nurse's aide was bathing patients and Majors was going in front of her passing medications. As a result of a seizure, a code was called for Cecil Smith at 1150 hrs. on April 3, 1994. Nurse Jackie Donald attended this code and Smith recovered. At 1310 hrs., the patient was transferred to Intensive Care. According to respiratory therapist, Amy Krabel, Majors was working alone in the ICU on this date.

At 1313 hrs., on April 3, 1994 Smith manifested hypertension tachycardia. Specifically his blood pressure unexpectedly spiked at 229/158. Mr. Smith had no history of significant hypertension. On April 3, 1994, his electrocardiograph strips manifested changes consistent with rising and falling potassium levels. It was further noted that the potassium level of his blood which was being monitored at the time, shot to 6.9. Normal range is 3.5 to 4.5. The levels shown by the blood tests revealed that at 1238 hrs., on the date of his death, his potassium level was 3.9. His potassium levels at 1419 hrs. Were 6.8. At 1440 hrs., it was 5.7 and at 1527 hrs., it was 4.9. According to the medical experts, this sudden elevation of his potassium level is not explainable by a natural event given his condition as reflected in his medical records. Neither is the sudden and unexpected high blood pressure or hypertension tachycardia. Smith's blood pressure as taken in the emergency room was normal.

At 1551 hrs. Smith died in the Intensive Care Unit. His chart did not contain any entries between 1313 hrs. and 1551 hrs..

It is the opinion of the medical team that Cecil Smith's death was not in the clinical course and is consistent with both patterns. His hypertension tachycardia and EKG changes are consistent with injections of substances in the nature of epinephrine and potassium.

Dr. John Heidingsfelder performed an autopsy on Cecil Smith. There was nothing in the autopsy that could account for the death of Cecil Smith as a natural event. The elbow and forearm subcutaneous dissection at autopsy revealed venous thrombosis of the right cephalic vein and interstitial hemorrhage to the right anticubitalfossi. This is consistent with the body's reaction to the insult of potassium.

Investigators further learned that Nurse Carolyn Wilson heard Cecil Smith complain of a burning sensation which is also consistent with the body's reaction to the insult of potassium.

It is the opinion of the medical review team who has reviewed this chart that Cecil Smith's death is not in the clinical course. It was sudden, unexpected and consistent with injections of substances in the nature of epinephrine and potassium. Dr. Bruce Waller, the cardiac pathologist, saw nothing by way of his examination to account for this death from a cardiac natural point.

Your Affiant, therefore, has probable cause to believe that Majors knowingly killed another human being, to wit: Cecil Smith.

4) Luella Hopkins

Luella Hopkins was a eighty-nine (89) year old female who was admitted to the Vermillion County Hospital on December 24, 1993 at 1705 hrs.

Ms. Hopkins died on January 8, 1994 at 1428 hrs.

Majors was working on January 8, 1994 from 0656 hrs to 1828 hrs.

Luella Hopkins was placed in room 220 of the Medical/Surgical unit. Georgia Hobson, another patient in the hospital, occupied the other bed in room 220.

Dr. Elias was Luella's treating physician. He had been monitoring her for pneumonia related problems and told the investigators that her pneumonia had cleared up. Luella had gained weight and he was planning to release her very soon.

Margaret Glascock, a sister, stated to the investigators that prior to Luella's death, she had improved greatly, gained weight and getting stronger. She was planning to go home the next day (January 9, 1994).

On January 8, 1994, at approximately 1428 hours, Majors entered room 220. According to a statement given to the investigators by Georgia Hobson, Luella's roommate, Majors then stated Honey I 'm going to give you a shot now. Majors then proceeded to give Luella an injection. Majors according to Georgia, was carrying a syringe in his left hand. Georgia Hobson said that Luella, then, let out a big sigh. Majors left the room. According to Jackie Donald, the RN on duty, Majors proceeded to the nurses' station and told her that there was a problem in 220. Jackie Donald then proceeded to the room and saw Luella gasping.

Jackie Donald stated to the investigators that she believes Luella was, in fact, dead when she (Jackie) entered room 220. A code was called and a telemetry unit was placed on Luella. It revealed that her heart was asystole. It had suddenly stopped beating.

Luella died at 1428 hrs. The medical records of Luella Hopkins do not reveal that any shot or injection was ordered or charted. Jackie Donald told the investigators Luella should not have received any injections.

The medical records of Georgia Hobson were reviewed for purposes of determining whether or not there was anything to affect Georgia Hobson's recollection. There was nothing in the medical records to indicate that such was the case. In talking to the investigators, she appeared alert, coherent and credible.

An autopsy performed by Dr. Mark LeVaughn on the body of Luella Hopkins did not reveal any medical reason as to why she would have died. Her disease did not correlate as to the manner of her death. Although she had coronary artery disease, the autopsy did not reveal any closure of the coronary vessels. There was nothing revealed on autopsy that would explain why Luella, who was doing reasonably well, would have suddenly died.

Dr. Bruce Waller, the cardiac pathologist, reviewed slides of her heart tissue. He did not discover anything by way of his examination that would account for the suddenness of her death.

It is the opinion of the medical team that the death of Luella Hopkins is a death that is sudden, unexpected and inconsistent with Luella's clinical course.

It is the opinion of the medical team that the death of Luella Hopkins is consistent with the exogenous administration of a foreign substance into her body which would cause a suppression of her heart's electrical activity.

Your Affiant, therefore, has probable cause to believe that Majors knowingly killed another human being, to wit: Luella Hopkins.

5) Margaret Hornick

Margaret Hornick was a seventy-nine (79) year old female who was admitted to Vermillion County Hospital on November 24, 1994 at 1627 hrs., after falling and fracturing her hip at the Lee Alan Bryant Nursing Home

Ms. Hornick died on November 25, 1994 at 1630 hrs.

Majors was working on November 25, 1994 from 1256 hrs. to 1916 hrs..

She was placed on the Medical/Surgical floor, the first night, then moved to the Intensive Care Unit following her surgery.

Majors charted her care in the Intensive Care Unit. After being in the Intensive Care Unit only nine 9 minutes and under Majors' care, she died. Her death occurred on November 24, 1994 at 1630 hours.

Investigators talked with a Mr. Donald Rolando, Margaret's brother, who visited her on November 23, 1994. He said she was doing fine. He also visited her in the recovery room after her surgery, and told the investigators that she was doing fine at that point. He also was with her as she was being placed in the Intensive Care Unit. Majors told him, at that point in time, that everything was fine and that he could go home. He left. Minutes later Margaret Hornick died.

Kellie Page the Vermillion County Hospital emergency room nurse who transferred Margaret to room 208 of the Medical/Surgical Unit told the investigators that Margaret, at that point in time, was stable. There was nothing to indicate that any alarm existed. Nurse Sharon Calvert also told the investigators that Margaret Hornick was stable in the recovery room.

Dr. William Mason, who was on staff at the Hospital, told the investigators that Margaret Hornick's death was not an expected outcome for her stay in the hospital. Linda Ping, a Charge Nurse on the Medical/Surgical floor, stated to an investigator that she was very surprised how quickly Margaret deteriorated upon her arrival at the Intensive Care Unit.

Bill Balla, a nurse at the hospital, also indicated that Margaret did not appear to be in poor condition. He further noted that according to her chart, lidocaine was given to her by Majors. No lidocaine was ordered for Margaret Hornick. Martha Starkey, a registered nurse on duty, indicated that Margaret was stable and was not at great risk for the type of surgery she underwent.

Dr. Berger, Margaret's family doctor, believes that Margaret's death is very suspicious given the drastic change in her condition within nine 9 minutes after being placed in ICU. He further noted to the investigators that Margaret's chart indicates that according to Majors that Dr. Berger was notified by Majors of Margaret's changing condition. Dr. Berger does not recall this and since his office is right across the parking lot from Vermillion County Hospital, he stated that would have gone right over to attend to Margaret if, in fact, he had been so notified. He further did not order lidocaine. Majors charting that he did so is false.

Dr. William Warren further related to investigators that Margaret's death was a surprising development given her condition as noted at the initial assessment. No drugs should have been given to her. In the event of a code situation, she was to receive supportive care only.

Dr. Mark LeVaughn performed an autopsy on the body of Margaret Hornick. His autopsy findings show no identifiable anatomic cause of death consistent with a natural cause. There is nothing revealed by way of his autopsy examination that would explain why she died in 9 minutes. Dr. Bruce Waller, the cardiac pathologist, also reviewed the slides of Margaret's heart tissue and found no evidence of any cardiac defect that could account for her sudden death.

It is the opinion of the medical team that Margaret Hornick's death is a sudden, unexplained death which is inconsistent with her clinical course and which occurred almost immediately after her exposure to Majors. It is consistent with the exogenous administration of a foreign substance.

Your Affiant, therefore, has probable cause to believe that Majors knowingly killed Margaret Hornick, another human being.

6) Freddie Wilson

Freddie Wilson was a fifty-six (56) year old male who was admitted to the Vermillion County Hospital on February 15, 1995 at 2315 hrs. with an admitting diagnosis of pneumonia.

Freddie Wilson died on February 16, 1995 1135 hrs..

Majors was working at Vermillion County Hospital from 0654 hrs. to 1859 hrs..

On February 16 Mr. Wilson is received into the Intensive Care Unit. Nurse Beth Sanquenetti performs an assessment at that time. She noted that the patient denied any chest pain or complaints of nausea and vomiting. This assessment was done at 0030 hrs.. At 0400 hrs. she noted that he was not wheezing and denied any pain or shortness of breath.

At 0800 hrs., Majors begins charting the patient. He notes that the patient is becoming restless and complaining of chest pain at 1015 hrs.. He notes at 1020 hrs. the respiration distress increased.

Tonya Beard, a daughter of the patient, observed Majors examining her father just prior to his death. She further states that Majors told her and Mr. Wilson's wife that he didn't think the patient would make it. The statement was made before any code was called.

At 1135 hrs on February 16, 1995 Mr. Wilson died.

A review of Mr. Wilson's EKG strips by Dr. Eric Prystowski led him to conclude that the changes are consistent with an injection of a substance most likely potassium at 1126 hrs..

Dr. John Heidingsfelder performed an autopsy upon the body of Freddie Wilson. Dr. Heidingsfelder concluded that Mr. Wilson did not die of pneumonia as was recorded on Mr. Wilson's death certificate. Examination of the heart did not reveal any significant degree of atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries and the heart did not appear to be enlarged. There was no evidence of any old or recent heart attack in the heart muscle. Dr. Bruce Waller, the cardiac pathologist, reviewed slides of the heart tissue of Mr. Wilson and did not discover anything by way of his examination that would account for his sudden death.

It is the opinion of the medical review team that Mr. Wilson's death was sudden and unexpected, not in the clinical course.

Mr. Wilson's death is also significant from an investigative standpoint for the reason that his death is one of three 3 which occurred on February 16, 1995. The other two patients in the Intensive Care Unit who died on that date were Mattie Brown and Marselene Walters. The time of Mattie Brown's death was approximately 1321 hrs. on February 16. The time of Marselene Walters death was approximately 1314 hrs. on February 16. Brown, Walters and Wilson died while Majors was in the Intensive Care Unit during lunchtime.

Your Affiant, therefore, has probable cause to believe that Majors knowingly killed Freddie Wilson, another human being.

Toxicology testing and analysis was performed on tissue samples taken from the exhumed bodies of the above named patients. Dr. Michael Evans of AIT laboratories informed the investigators that substances such as potassium chloride and epinephrine would not be detected by such analysis.

The investigators have also been made aware of certain comments made by Majors during the course of his employment at the Vermillion County Hospital which is evidence of an animosity or insensitivity on his part towards those patients or individuals who would come under his care.

Joann Powell, a housekeeper for the hospital, related to the investigators that she was present when a patient was calling for a nurse and Majors responded to the request by stating Let the patient die.. Nurse Camille Costa-Kuglin stated to investigators that Majors referred to the families as a "fucking bunch of whiners." She stated that families upset Majors and he referred to them as ·White trash. and Dirt. Allison Williamson, a housekeeper, also confirmed that Majors made derogatory comments about patients under his breath and referred to one patient as a bitch. Patty Young, a licensed practical nurse, told the investigators that Orville Lynn Majors Jr. referred to family members as "white trash." and made fun of poverty stricken people. Michael Hoevet, an employee with the Wellness Center, was in the ICU on 11/15/94 doing a safety inspection. Bev Roberts was with him. They entered the ICU. Majors was alone. Hoevet asked him what he was doing. Majors replied I'm just sitting here waiting for the woman to die.. Hoevet and Roberts observed an elderly, alert woman sitting up in bed. She was coughing. Majors walked to the monitor and said, "C'mon baby, C'mon baby." Majors then called for assistance. Hoevet and Roberts left the ICU and heard a code blue called. The patient died.

Paul Havlen, a former friend of Majors, told the investigators that between 1984 and 1986, Majors told him that he (Majors) "hated old people and that they should all be gassed." Majors also stated this opinion to Kenny Hoffeditz, another former friend. According to Hoffeditz, Majors said old people were a "waste." Orville Lynn Majors Jr. said this several times to Hoffeditz.

The above statements are said forth in this affidavit by your Affiant for the purpose of establishing probable cause for the issuance of a warrant for Majors on multiple counts of homicide. Your Affiant respectfully requests that the Court find probable cause for the arrest of Orville Lynn Majors Jr. on charges of murder.

EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE SPECIFICALLY INDICATED, ALL OF THE ABOVE OCCURRED WITHIN VERMILLION COUNTY, STATE OF INDIANA.

I affirm under the penalties for perjury, that the foregoing representations are true.

Dated this 24th day of December, 1997.

Detective Frank Turchi, Affiant



Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors who may have killed 130 of his elderly patients, standing in front of West
General Community Hospital (formerly Vermillion County Hospital) where the murders took place.
(Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)



Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors w. his live-in lover Nancy Ryan, & her baby Mikayla, cuddling on
couch in his apt. (Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)




Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors bottle-feeding his live-in lover Nancy Ryan's baby Mikayla, while babysitting
for her at his apt. (Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)




Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors w. his live-in lover Nancy Ryan, playing w. her baby Mikayla in his apt.
(Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)




Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors (2L), playing bingo w. his sister (R), & mom Anna Bell at American Legion hall.
(Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)




Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors (2L), playing bingo w. his sister (R), mom Anna Bell & his live-in lover
Nancy Ryan at American Legion hall.
(Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)



Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors (R) sitting w. his lawyer Marshall Pinkus while going over his case which
alleges he may have killed 130 of his elderly patients while on ICU duty at Vermillion County Hospital,
now West General Community Hospital.
(Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)



Serial murderer, nurse Lynn Majors who may have killed 130 of his elderly patients while on duty at
Vermillion County Hospital.
(Photo by Taro Yamasaki//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)



Orville Lynn Majors




Orville Lynn Majors



Orville Lynn Majors



Orville Lynn Majors



Orville Lynn Majors




The Vermillion County Hospital where the deaths occurred is now known as West Central Community Hospital.
 
Top