Our World Still Has Many Nice Places as Well (2 Viewers)

Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot



Located in a mountainous region that was cut off from the rest of the world for a long period of time, these villages with their Gassho-style houses subsisted on the cultivation of mulberry trees and the rearing of silkworms. The large houses with their steeply pitched thatched roofs are the only examples of their kind in Japan. Despite economic upheavals, the villages of Ogimachi, Ainokura and Suganuma are outstanding examples of a traditional way of life perfectly adapted to the environment and people's social and economic circumstances.The Gassho-style houses found in the Historic Villages of Shirakawa-go and Gokayama are rare examples of their kind in Japan. Located in a river valley surrounded by the rugged high-mountain Chubu region of central Japan, these three villages were remote and isolated, and access to the area was difficult for a long period of time.

The inscribed property comprises the villages of “Ogimachi” in the Shirakawa-go region, and “Ainokura” and “Suganuma” in the Gokayama region, all situated along the Sho River in Gifu and Toyama Prefectures. In response to the geographical and social background, a specific housing type evolved: rare examples of Gassho-style houses, a unique farmhouse style that makes use of highly rational structural systems evolved to adapt to the natural environment and site-specific social and economic circumstances in particular the cultivation of mulberry trees and the rearing of silkworms. The large houses have steeply-pitched thatched roofs and have been preserved in groups, many with their original outbuildings which permit the associated landscapes to remain intact.

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two dogs fucking

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Victoria Falls, spectacular waterfall located about midway along the course of the Zambezi River, at the border between Zambia to the north and Zimbabwe to the south. Approximately twice as wide and twice as deep as Niagara Falls, the waterfall spans the entire breadth of the Zambezi River at one of its widest points (more than 5,500 feet [1,700 metres]). At the falls, the river plunges over a sheer precipice to a maximum drop of 355 feet (108 metres). The falls’ mean flow is almost 33,000 cubic feet (935 cubic metres) per second.The Zambezi River does not gather speed as it nears the drop, the approach being signaled only by the mighty roar and characteristic veil of mist for which the Kalolo-Lozi people named the falls Mosi-oa-Tunya (“The Smoke That Thunders”). The lip of the falls’ precipice is split into several parts by various small islands, depressions, and promontories along its edge. The eastern portions of the falls are mostly dry during times of low river flow.




IMAGE #1>Aerial few of the world famous Victoria Falls with a large rainbow over the falls. This is right at the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe in Southern Africa. The mighty Victoria Falls at Zambezi river are one of the most visited touristic places in Africa.

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IMAGE #2>Aerial Victoria falls with rainbow, Livingstone, Zambia/Zimbabwe.

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IMAGE #3>The "Devil's Cataract" at sunrise, at the Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe.

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IMAGE #4>Victoria Falls, Devils Cataract, Zimbabwe.

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IMAGE #5>Zimbabwe side of Victoria Falls, (Mosi-oa-Tunya). Victoria Falls is a waterfall of 355ft (109m) on the Zambezi River on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe in Southern Africa.

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Is that the entrance to Wakanda
 

Gh0zt™

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Located in a mountainous region that was cut off from the rest of the world for a long period of time, these villages with their Gassho-style houses subsisted on the cultivation of mulberry trees and the rearing of silkworms. The large houses with their steeply pitched thatched roofs are the only examples of their kind in Japan. Despite economic upheavals, the villages of Ogimachi, Ainokura and Suganuma are outstanding examples of a traditional way of life perfectly adapted to the environment and people's social and economic circumstances.The Gassho-style houses found in the Historic Villages of Shirakawa-go and Gokayama are rare examples of their kind in Japan. Located in a river valley surrounded by the rugged high-mountain Chubu region of central Japan, these three villages were remote and isolated, and access to the area was difficult for a long period of time.

The inscribed property comprises the villages of “Ogimachi” in the Shirakawa-go region, and “Ainokura” and “Suganuma” in the Gokayama region, all situated along the Sho River in Gifu and Toyama Prefectures. In response to the geographical and social background, a specific housing type evolved: rare examples of Gassho-style houses, a unique farmhouse style that makes use of highly rational structural systems evolved to adapt to the natural environment and site-specific social and economic circumstances in particular the cultivation of mulberry trees and the rearing of silkworms. The large houses have steeply-pitched thatched roofs and have been preserved in groups, many with their original outbuildings which permit the associated landscapes to remain intact.

*Please click the green link for further info.




looks like windows ME backgrounds.
 

Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Saint Lucia was first known as “Louanalao” by the Arawak Indians in 200 AD, meaning “Island of the Iguanas,” and then “Hewanorra,” in 800 AD when the Carib Indians arrived and assimilated their culture into Saint Lucia. Residents of Carib descent can still be found in Saint Lucia today. The Caribs lived on Saint Lucia until the 1600s, when settlers attempted to take control of the island to boost European trade. Even during this period of colonialism, the Caribs continued to fight and stopped multiple attempts by the English and French to settle on the island. Juan de Cosa didn’t actually colonize Saint Lucia. That honor falls to a pirate named François Le Clerc, nicknamed Jambe de Bois because of his wooden leg. Peg-Leg Le Clerc used Pigeon Island to attack Spanish ships in the 1550s, and the island is now a National Landmark with historic sites and museums to enthrall those who visit.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Lake Bled in north-western Slovenia could easily be described as being “Picture Postcard Perfect” with its warm blue waters reflecting the craggy Julian Alps and its tiny island on which stands a church that could have featured in any fairytale. It is by no means a large lake measuring a mere 2,120 m by 1,380 m and a leisurely stroll completely around the lake can be completed in about 90 minutes. It has long been a favourite Slovenian tourist attraction but has remained completely unspoiled.

This mountainous area is part of a limestone “karst” formation and, as such, features extensive fissures, deep valleys and steep rock faces. Caves and underground aquifers are also typically observed. The site of Lake Bled, however, was once the location of the Bohinj Glacier during the ice-age. When the ice melted the lake was formed. The lake is unusual in that it is not fed by any river or stream but rather by water emerging from springs. Some of these springs in the north-eastern part of the lake are geo-thermally heated resulting in the water in the lake being pleasantly warm and suitable for swimming.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot



Luxor, also called El-Aksur, city and capital of Al-Uqṣur muḥāfaẓah (governorate), Upper Egypt. Luxor has given its name to the southern half of the ruins of the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes. Area governorate, 1,080 square miles (2,800 square km); city, 160 square miles (415 square km). Pop. (2017) governorate, 1,250,209; (2018 est.) city, 127,994.


The southern part of Thebes grew up around a beautiful temple dedicated to Amon, king of the gods, his consort Mut, and their son Khons. Commissioned by King Amenhotep III (Amenophis III; reigned 1390–53 BCE) of the late 18th dynasty, the temple was built close to the Nile River and parallel with the bank and is known today as the Temple of Luxor. An avenue of sphinxes connected it to the Great Temple of Amon at Karnak. The modern name Luxor (Arabic: Al-Uqṣur) means “The Palaces” or perhaps “The Forts,” from the Roman castra.

A small pavilion is all that is left of previous building on the site, though there probably was a temple there earlier in the 18th dynasty if not before. Amenhotep III’s temple was completed by Tutankhamen (reigned 1333–23) and Horemheb (1319–1292). Ramses II (1279–13) added another court, a pylon, and obelisks; smaller additions were made to the temple in Ptolemaic times. Its hypostyle hall was at one time converted into a Christian church, and the remains of another Coptic church can be seen to the west of it.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Stretching on for miles upon miles, the sand dunes in Brazil's Lençóis Maranhenses National Park are so vast and so blindingly white that it's easy to see how the park got its name—Lençóis Maranhenses, in Portuguese, literally means "bedsheets of Maranhão," the northeastern coastal state where the national park is found.Two rivers run through the Lençóis Maranhenses—these rivers push sand from the interior of the continent to the Atlantic Ocean, depositing thousands of tons of sediment along Brazil's northern coast. This alone isn't a unique phenomenon—sediment flowing through rivers helps form beaches along many coastlines. But in Lençóis Maranhenses, the sand doesn't stay put.

During the dry season, especially during the months of October and November, powerful winds from the equatorial Atlantic whip the sand back inland, carrying it as far as 30 miles and creating the vast, sculpted sand dunes for which the park is famous.At first glance, it looks like a picture-perfect desert—miles and miles of sand with almost no vegetation. But it's not a desert—Lençóis Maranhenses gets about 47 inches of rain each year, making it too rainy to be officially considered a desert (which get less than ten inches a year). From the months of January to June, the area is inundated with torrential rainstorms. Rainwater pools in the valleys between the dunes creating thousands of crystal clear lagoons. In July, when the park's lagoons are at their peak, some reach over 300 feet long and ten feet deep.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Cinque Terre is the name of a district that encompasses five glorious towns, where small houses are surrounded by lush nature. Visitors to this district will be fascinated by the beauty of these five small villages, namely: Manarola, Riomaggiore, Corniglia, Vernazza and Monterosso al Mare. The inhabitants of Cinque Terre benefite not only from its pristine waters, but from its natural environment, where wild nature is interspersed with vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards, creating a precious bond between man, his traditions and this breathtaking stretch of coast.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Maldives, in full Republic of Maldives, also called Maldive Islands, independent island country in the north-central Indian Ocean. It consists of a chain of about 1,200 small coral islands and sandbanks (some 200 of which are inhabited), grouped in clusters, or atolls.The islands extend more than 510 miles (820 km) from north to south and 80 miles (130 km) from east to west. The northernmost atoll is about 370 miles (600 km) south-southwest of the Indian mainland, and the central area, including the capital island of Male (Male’), is about 400 miles (645 km) southwest of Sri Lanka.

The Maldive Islands are a series of coral atolls built up from the crowns of a submerged ancient volcanic mountain range. All the islands are low-lying, none rising to more than 6 feet (1.8 meters) above sea level. Barrier reefs protect the islands from the destructive effects of monsoons. The rainy season, from May to August, is brought by the southwest monsoon; from December to March the northeast monsoon brings dry and mild winds. The average annual temperature varies from 76 to 86 °F (24 to 30 °C). Rainfall averages about 84 inches (2,130 mm) per year. The atolls have sandy beaches, lagoons, and a luxuriant growth of coconut palms, together with breadfruit trees and tropical bushes. Fish abound in the reefs, lagoons, and seas adjoining the islands; sea turtles are caught for food and for their oil, a traditional medicine.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Mount Kinabalu, Malay Gunung Kinabalu, highest peak in the Malay Archipelago, rising to 13,455 feet (4,101 m) in north-western East Malaysia (North Borneo). Lying near the centre of the Crocker Range, the massif gently emerges from a level plain and abruptly rises from a rocky slope into a great, barren, flat-topped block 0.5 miles (0.8 km) long. Gully-scarred, the plateau block is surrounded by black granite cliffs and precipices thousands of feet high. The mountain’s lower slopes are farmed up to about 2,000 feet (600 m).The peak is the spirit homeland for the indigenous Kadazan people, and its name is derived from their term Akinabalu (“Revered Place of the Dead”). It was formerly known as St. Peter’s Mount. The first European to climb Kinabalu was Hugh (later Sir Hugh) Low, who made the ascent from Tuaran in 1851. Kota Belud (“Hill Fort”), perched on its slopes, is known for its Sunday market and pony races. Kinabalu National Park (291 square miles [754 square km]) encompasses Mount Kinabalu and surrounding parts of the Crocker Range.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot



The Everglades is a subtropical wetland ecosystem spanning two million acres across central and south Florida. During the wet season, Lake Okeechobee overflows, releasing water into a very slow moving, shallow river dominated by sawgrass marsh—dubbed the "river of grass." The water flows southward, passing through diverse habitats, including cypress swamps, wet prairie, and mangroves, until it reaches Everglades National Park and eventually Florida Bay. Originally the Greater Everglades ecosystem had a large diversity of habitats connected by wetlands and water bodies. Since the 1800s, humans have been altering the Everglades landscape. Water diversions and flood control structures restrict the flow of water across the sensitive landscape. Combined with agricultural and urban development, the size of the Everglades has decreased dramatically, affecting the quality of habitats in the area.

The Everglades is surrounded by human development, including the cities of Miami and Fort Lauderdale. Its wetlands and wildlife draw large numbers of birders, anglers, boaters, and other outdoor enthusiasts. The Everglades also provides critical, and often undervalued, benefits to people, called ecosystem services. For example, the Everglades ecosystem provides drinking water for one-third of Floridians and irrigation for much of the state's agriculture. The wetlands improve water quality by filtering out pollutants and absorbing excess nutrients, replenish aquifers, and reduce flooding. The Everglades is internationally known for its extraordinary wildlife. More than 360 bird species can be found in Everglades National Park alone. The Everglades is known for its many wading birds, such as white and glossy ibises, roseate spoonbills, egrets, herons, and wood storks. It also hosts huge numbers of smaller migratory birds. Some birds, such as the snail kite, wood stork, and Cape Sable seaside sparrow are threatened or endangered species.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, and the third largest desert behind Antarctica and the Arctic, which are both cold deserts. The Sahara is one of the harshest environments on Earth, covering 3.6 million square miles (9.4 million square kilometers), nearly a third of the African continent, about the size of the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii). The name of the desert comes from the Arabic word ṣaḥrāʾ, which means "desert. "The Sahara is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean on the west, the Red Sea on the east, the Mediterranean Sea on the north and the Sahel Savannah on the south. The enormous desert spans 11 countries: Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Western Sahara, Sudan and Tunisia.

The Sahara desert has a variety of land features, but is most famous for the sand dune fields that are often depicted in movies. The dunes can reach almost 600 feet (183 meters) high but they cover only about 15 percent of the entire desert. Other topographical features include mountains, plateaus, sand- and gravel-covered plains, salt flats, basins and depressions. Mount Koussi, an extinct volcano in Chad, is the highest point in the Sahara at 11,204 feet (3,415 m), and the Qattara Depression in Egypt is the Saraha's deepest point, at 436 feet (133 m) below sea level.

Although water is scarce across the entire region, the Sahara contains two permanent rivers (the Nile and the Niger), at least 20 seasonal lakes and huge aquifers, which are the primary sources of water in the more than 90 major desert oases. Water management authorities once feared the aquifers in the Sahara would soon dry up due to overuse, but a study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters in 2013, discovered that the "fossil" (nonrenewable) aquifers were still being fed via rain and runoff.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


The American Southwest is the “canyon capital of the world,” from the vast, massive Grand Canyon, to canyons so narrow, even the slenderest of people would be challenged to squeeze through some of them. It is in this latter category where you’ll find Page, AZ’s world-famous Antelope Canyon.

Antelope Canyon is an example of a geological curiosity known as a “slot canyon.” As the name suggests, slot canyons are tiny canyons formed when water finds its way into a crack or fissure in the bedrock. Occurring largely in deserts or areas with low rainfall, a slot canyon is the result of thousands of years of weather extremes. In the case of Antelope Canyon, an intermittent creek that now empties into the Colorado River would erupt in turbulent flash floods that wore away the sandstone rock face, followed by hot, dry periods where sandstorms buffed the canyon walls to a striated, swirled finish. Over time, these weather patterns lessened in severity, but this natural process of erosion continues to be a part of Antelope Canyon’s ongoing evolution.

Accounts of how Antelope Canyon was first discovered vary. One of the more widely circulated versions asserts that around the time of the Great Depression, a Navajo girl was herding livestock on her family’s ancestral lands near what is now Page, Arizona. Along the way, she wandered into a “crack” in a sandstone wall where the outside world fell silent, and divine rays of light illuminated the sculpted chambers of the cave-like formation through a gap in the roof. Some elders of the Navajo tribe maintain that “Long Walk” holdouts took refuge in Antelope Canyon in the late 1800’s, and that spiritual beings continue to keep watch over the area.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot

Paris


Paris, city and capital of France, situated in the north-central part of the country. People were living on the site of the present-day city, located along the Seine River some 233 miles (375 km) upstream from the river’s mouth on the English Channel (La Manche), by about 7600 BCE. The modern city has spread from the island (the Île de la Cité) and far beyond both banks of the Seine.Paris occupies a central position in the rich agricultural region known as the Paris Basin, and it constitutes one of eight départements of the Île-de-France administrative region. It is by far the country’s most important centre of commerce and culture. Area city, 41 square miles (105 square km); metropolitan area, 890 square miles (2,300 square km). Pop. (2012) city, 2,265,886; (2015 est.) urban agglomeration, 10,858,000.For centuries Paris has been one of the world’s most important and attractive cities. It is appreciated for the opportunities it offers for business and commerce, for study, for culture, and for entertainment; its gastronomy, haute couture, painting, literature, and intellectual community especially enjoy an enviable reputation. Its sobriquet “the City of Light” (“la Ville Lumière”), earned during the Enlightenment, remains appropriate, for Paris has retained its importance as a center for education and intellectual pursuits.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot



Plitvice Lakes is the oldest and largest national park in the Republic of Croatia. The park is situated in the mountainous region of Croatia, between the Mala Kapela mountain range in the west and northwest, and the Lička Plješivica mountain range to the southeast. Administratively, the park falls within two counties: Lika-Senj (90.7%) and Karlovac (9.3%).

With its exceptional natural beauty, this area has always attracted nature lovers, and already on 8 April 1949, it was proclaimed Croatia’s first national park. The process of tufa formation, which results in the building of the tufa, or travertine, barriers and resulted in the creation of the lakes, is the outstanding universal value, for which the Plitvice Lakes were internationally recognised on 26 October 1979 with their inscription onto the UNESCO World Heritage List. In 1997, the boundaries of the national park were expanded, and today it covers an area just under 300 km2. The park is primarily covered in forest vegetation, with smaller areas under grasslands. The most attractive part of the park – the lakes – cover just under 1% of the total park area.

The lake system is comprised of 16 named and several smaller unnamed lakes, cascading one into the next. Due to the geological substrate and characteristic hydrogeological conditions, the lake system has been divided into the Upper and Lower lakes. The twelve lakes forming the Upper Lakes are: Prošćansko jezero, Ciginovac, Okrugljak, Batinovac, Veliko jezero, Malo jezero, Vir, Galovac, Milino jezero, Gradinsko jezero, Burgeti and Kozjak. These lakes were formed on impermeable dolomite rock, and are larger, with more indented and gentler shores than the Lower Lakes. The Lower Lakes, consisting of the lakes Milanovac, Gavanovac, Kaluđerovac and Novakovića Brod, were formed in permeable limestone substrate, cut into a deep canyon with steep cliffs. The lakes end in the impressive waterfalls Sastavci, with the Korana River springing under the base of the falls.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Chamonix, where you will find our luxury ski chalets, is the birthplace of modern mountaineering and often known as the Alpine skiing capital of the world. As a destination, it has a reputation for the extreme and this, whilst undoubtedly true, can mask a wide array of sporting and leisure activities for pure pleasure and relaxation. A great casino and nightlife, unrivaled spectacular scenery, music and sport, passionate local culture, culinary delights and the peace and quiet of mountain life. Enjoy Chamonix at whatever pace suits you. There really is something for everyone here. The lively streets of Chamonix are colorful with a mix of sports shops, guides' offices, restaurants, bars and cafes. Every Saturday morning, the town hosts an outdoor market, brimming with local crafts and produce. On grey weather days there is a cinema, bowling alley, ice rink, a large sports center with a pool and gym as well as indoor climbing facilities to discover. Take the time to visit one of the numerous museums and learn about the incredible local history; there was a time when the locals believed these mountains and their glaciers to be possessed by demons. After the enlightenment, these once feared structures became the heart of the economy as the booming new trade of Alpine tourism emerged. It all started here!

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Milford Sound, inlet of the Tasman Sea, southwestern South Island, New Zealand. The sound is a fjord, created when the sea flooded a glacial valley. About 2 miles (3 km) wide, it extends inland for 12 miles (19 km). From the heights of Mitre Peak (5,560 feet [1,695 meters]) and Pembroke Peak (6,710 feet [2,045 meters]), the valley walls plunge steeply beneath the water, reaching a depth of 1,680 feet (512 meters) near the fjord’s head. The sound is entered by the Arthur and Cleddau rivers from the main valley and by the Bowen, Sinbad, Harrison, and Stirling rivers from side valleys. Named by a whaler in the 1820s because of its resemblance to Milford Haven in Wales, the sound was surveyed by Captain John Lort Stokes of the Royal Navy in 1851. The sound is the northernmost fjord in Fiordland National Park and the terminus of the Milford walking track. It is also the site of a town, Milford Sound, one of the region’s few permanently inhabited places.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


Socotra, also spelled Sokotra, Arabic Suquṭrā, island in the Indian Ocean about 210 miles (340 km) southeast of Yemen, to which it belongs. The largest of several islands extending eastward from the Horn of Africa, it has an area of about 1,400 square miles (3,600 square km). The Hajīr (Hajhir) Mountains occupy Socotra’s interior, with narrow coastal plains in the north and a broader plain in the south. To the southwest and west are the smaller islands of Samḥah and Darzah, called al-Ikhwān (“the Brothers”), and ʿAbd al-Kūrī, all of which also belong to Yemen. The islands stand on coral banks and may once have been connected with the African and Arabian mainlands.

Socotra’s flora includes several famous species, among them myrrh, frankincense, and the dragon’s blood tree. In recognition of its distinct plant and animal life, the archipelago was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008.Socotra’s name is traced to the Sanskrit dvipa-sakhadara, “island abode of bliss.” The island is mentioned in various legends. The inhabitants long were Christians, but that religion disappeared from the island in the 17th century. Socotra was long ruled by the Mahra sultans of southeastern Yemen. Their rule on Socotra was interrupted by Portuguese occupation between 1507 and 1511. In 1834 the British tried and failed to purchase the island; in the 1880s, however, the sultan accepted British protection for the entire sultanate. The sultanate came to an end in 1967, when Socotra became part of independent South Yemen, and later, unified Yemen.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


French Polynesia, overseas collectivity of France consisting of five archipelagoes in the south-central Pacific Ocean. Included are some 130 islands scattered across the Pacific between latitudes 7° and 27° S and longitudes 134° and 155° W—a total land area roughly equivalent to that of metropolitan Paris and London combined but spread across a swath of ocean five times as large as France.The archipelagoes of French Polynesia are the Society Islands, Tuamotu Archipelago, Gambier Islands, Marquesas Islands, and Tubuai Islands. The capital, Papeete, is on Tahiti, French Polynesia’s largest island (403 square miles [1,043 square km]), in the Society group.

The islands are all protrusions of parallel submarine ridges trending from the northwest to the southeast. The Society Islands are the most westerly and extensive group, accounting for two-fifths of the land area and nearly nine-tenths of the population. They consist of two groups, the Îles du Vent (Windward Islands) in the east and the Îles Sous le Vent (Leeward Islands) in the west. Except for a few small coral atolls, the Society Islands resulted from the emergence of underwater volcanoes. The volcanic cones are highly eroded and cut up into high crests and deep, radiating valleys. The often lushly vegetated mountains drop abruptly to narrow coastal strips or directly into lagoons or the sea. The islands are protected from the force of the sea by almost completely encircling barrier reefs.

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Ivan Drago

ÜberApocaZealot


The Forbidden City is a large precinct of red walls and yellow glazed roof tiles located in the heart of China’s capital, Beijing. As its name suggests, the precinct is a micro-city in its own right. Measuring 961 meters in length and 753 meters in width, the Forbidden City is composed of more than 90 palace compounds including 98 buildings and surrounded by a moat as wide as 52 meters.The Forbidden City was the political and ritual center of China for over 500 years. After its completion in 1420, the Forbidden City was home to 24 emperors, their families and servants during the Ming (1368–1644) and the Qing (1644–1911) dynasties. The last occupant (who was also the last emperor of imperial China), Puyi (1906–67), was expelled in 1925 when the precinct was transformed into the Palace Museum. Although it is no longer an imperial precinct, it remains one of the most important cultural heritage sites and the most visited museum in the People’s Republic of China, with an average of eighty thousand visitors every day.

The construction of the Forbidden City was the result of a scandalous coup d’état plotted by Zhu Di, the fourth son of the Ming dynasty’s founder Zhu Yuanzhang, that made him the Chengzu emperor (his official title) in 1402. In order to solidify his power, the Chengzu emperor moved the capital, as well as his own army, from Nanjing in southeastern China to Beijing and began building a new heart of the empire, the Forbidden City.The establishment of the Qing dynasty in 1644 did not lessen the Forbidden City’s pivotal status, as the Manchu imperial family continued to live and rule there. While no major change has been made since its completion, the precinct has undergone various renovations and minor constructions well into the twentieth-first century. Since the Forbidden City is a ceremonial, ritual and living space, the architects who designed its layout followed the ideal cosmic order in Confucian ideology that had held Chinese social structure together for centuries. This layout ensured that all activities within this micro-city were conducted in the manner appropriate to the participants’ social and familial roles. All activities, such as imperial court ceremonies or life-cycle rituals, would take place in sophisticated palaces depending on the events’ characteristics. Similarly, the court determined the occupants of the Forbidden City strictly according to their positions in the imperial family.

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