The Hungarian Suicide Song (1 Viewer)

DeathsDoor

Knock Knock
If you listen to this song and you commit suicide can you please let me know. Thank you.

The Hungarian composer, Rezső Seress, wrote ‘Gloomy Sunday’ in 1933 and lyrics were written later by Hungarian poet László Jávor. The song immediately became known as “the suicide song” in Hungary and many reports were filed at the time claiming that the lyrics or sheet music were used in an alarming number of suicide notes. Legends say that there were 17 reported cases of such incidences, leading the Hungarian government to (allegedly) ban the song.

American music producers soon caught wind of this strange song and translated version began recording. The most popular recording was done by jazz legend Billie Holiday. Holiday’s version tacked on a more uplifting third verse, but the song still couldn’t shake its inherent depressing tone. The lyrics, after all, clearly dealt with suicide:

Sunday is gloomy,
My hours are slumberless
Dearest the shadows
I live with are numberless
Little white flowers
Will never awaken you
Not where the black coach of
Sorrow has taken you
Angels have no thought
Of ever returning you
Would they be angry
If I thought of joining you?
Gloomy Sunday

Legends About History’s Most Depressing Song
Legends continue with the recordings of the American translation. Some claim that no suicides have been linked to the song in the U.S., while others state that over 200 suicides worldwide (in English speaking countries) were at the fault of ‘Gloomy Sunday.’ Likewise, some say there were no reports of banning of the song in U.S., while others say it was “banned from the airwaves.”

Despite any “bans” that were instituted, ‘Gloomy Sunday’ is still being covered to this day. One legend about the song however is very true: Rezső Seress, the original composer, committed suicide in 1963 by jumping off a building in Budapest. Whether the song itself or his inability to write another hit again was the cause is unknown.


 

McM

Forum Veteran
Reminds me a bit of 'The Sorrows of Young Werther' a book from Goethe in the 18th century. It's said that many men did suicide after reading it. Napoleon said he read it seven times (but it didn't work).
It was banned in several areas even the clothing style of the book's fictional main character.

Romanticism was strong in those days.
 

McM

Forum Veteran
Reminds me of "Suicide is painless" by Johnny Mandel. I don't know if anyone "suicided" to it; but they did use the theme for one of the biggest smash hit TV shows of all time.


I think this song was played in a movie too, something with 'Alice's Restaurant' or so. If I remember correctly...
 

DeathsDoor

Knock Knock
Reminds me a bit of 'The Sorrows of Young Werther' a book from Goethe in the 18th century. It's said that many men did suicide after reading it. Napoleon said he read it seven times (but it didn't work).
It was banned in several areas even the clothing style of the book's fictional main character.

Romanticism was strong in those days.

He was suicidal then. Lucky number 7
 
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Reactions: McM

guyme91 📦🔓

Kinky weirdo ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Just because people use the words in suicide notes doesn't mean it caused them to commit suicide. It is more likely that it helped them express what they wanted to say. They were probably suicidal for a long time and would have done it at some point and maybe this song brought them comfort in that decision. At best it may have encouraged them, but isn't the cause of suicides.
 

McM

Forum Veteran
He was suicidal then. Lucky number 7

In one biography it's said he thought about taking his life after he was defeated in Russia and on other occasions but as an egomaniac, he had to take in account what would the history, the French etc. say about that.
 

DeathsDoor

Knock Knock
In one biography it's said he thought about taking his life after he was defeated in Russia and on other occasions but as an egomaniac, he had to take in account what would the history, the French etc. say about that.

Mix of the both I would think. Some people take it to heart when losing at something, anything!
 

Janine

Mini Wiconi -Water Is Life!
If you listen to this song and you commit suicide can you please let me know. Thank you.

The Hungarian composer, Rezső Seress, wrote ‘Gloomy Sunday’ in 1933 and lyrics were written later by Hungarian poet László Jávor. The song immediately became known as “the suicide song” in Hungary and many reports were filed at the time claiming that the lyrics or sheet music were used in an alarming number of suicide notes. Legends say that there were 17 reported cases of such incidences, leading the Hungarian government to (allegedly) ban the song.

American music producers soon caught wind of this strange song and translated version began recording. The most popular recording was done by jazz legend Billie Holiday. Holiday’s version tacked on a more uplifting third verse, but the song still couldn’t shake its inherent depressing tone. The lyrics, after all, clearly dealt with suicide:

Sunday is gloomy,
My hours are slumberless
Dearest the shadows
I live with are numberless
Little white flowers
Will never awaken you
Not where the black coach of
Sorrow has taken you
Angels have no thought
Of ever returning you
Would they be angry
If I thought of joining you?
Gloomy Sunday

Legends About History’s Most Depressing Song
Legends continue with the recordings of the American translation. Some claim that no suicides have been linked to the song in the U.S., while others state that over 200 suicides worldwide (in English speaking countries) were at the fault of ‘Gloomy Sunday.’ Likewise, some say there were no reports of banning of the song in U.S., while others say it was “banned from the airwaves.”

Despite any “bans” that were instituted, ‘Gloomy Sunday’ is still being covered to this day. One legend about the song however is very true: Rezső Seress, the original composer, committed suicide in 1963 by jumping off a building in Budapest. Whether the song itself or his inability to write another hit again was the cause is unknown.


Will do scouts honor!!
 

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