Uber's data mining cabs: Data of 12mln people passed to law enforcement in 2015

Gorgutz

Post-Mortem


In the last six months of 2015, Uber received 415 requests from US law enforcement for passenger or driver data related to criminal probes, the ride-hailing company said in a transparency report. Uber gave US agencies data on 12 million people overall.
The company "fully complied" with nearly 32 percent of law enforcement requests and "partially complied" with nearly 53 percent, while 15 percent of requests were withdrawn by law enforcement or the company found no data to offer, according to its first transparency report, which includes information the company gave to comply with transportation regulations and airport reporting requirements.
"The report shows that we comply with the majority of law enforcement requests, while ensuring they go through the proper legal process," Uber said in a blog post.
The company said 368 of total law enforcement requests were from state agencies, while 47 came from federal entities. The company said in nearly 85 percent of total requests, "some data was produced."

Within those 415 requests, Uber received 267 subpoenas, 90 search warrants, 30 "emergency" requests, and 28 court orders.
As for regulatory demands, Uber received 33 requests in the six months detailed, which involved trip data for more than 12 million riders and drivers. The company said it "frequently tries to narrow the scope of these demands, though our efforts are typically rebuffed."

"Of course regulators will always need some amount of data to be effective, just like law enforcement," Uber said in the blog post. "But in many cases they send blanket requests without explaining why the information is needed, or how it will be used. And while this kind of trip data doesn’t include personal information, it can reveal patterns of behavior—and is more than regulators need to do their jobs."

The company said it did not receive a National Security Letter or FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) order, which are typically reserved for national security or intelligence investigations involving communication service providers.


Uber's transparency report: Data of 12mln people passed to law enforc…
 
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Gorgutz

Gorgutz

Post-Mortem
Can someone explain please?
Uber has released its first 'transparency' report regarding requests from law enforcement due to 'safety concerns'. Trip data of 12 million users is released without any need for explanations from the ones requesting it (law enforcement).
 
OP
Gorgutz

Gorgutz

Post-Mortem
Uber has released its first 'transparency' report regarding requests from law enforcement due to 'safety concerns'. Trip data of 12 million users is released without any need for explanations from the ones requesting it (law enforcement).
Data-mining means collecting in a grand scale data, usually personal, without scrutiny or consent.
I might add that these services usually further expand the states' surveillance apparatus.
 

LilyCuster

Premium Member Bitches!
Data-mining means collecting in a grand scale data, usually personal, without scrutiny or consent.
I might add that these services usually further expand the states' surveillance apparatus.
I got that, but why does the NSA need intelligence on everyday people getting rides from here to there?
 
OP
Gorgutz

Gorgutz

Post-Mortem
I got that, but why does the NSA need intelligence on everyday people getting rides from here to there?
Because its intelligence, information. They basically hoard it or analyze it in real time, 'till they find a use to it. Just like they do with the internet, cellphones, surveillance cameras, drones and whatnot, they develop tools to turn everything into one huge machine that collects everyone's data, 24/7. (something that will never be fully achieved, because they do have limitations)

They also do like to make believe they control everything, which is bullshit.
 

McM

Forum Veteran
Our police/government let the providers save and store ID, timepoint and location of every mobile phone call/internet use for checking alibi and investigation reasons. It's for 4 until 10 weeks at the moment.
The mobile phone shit they're doing for years now, the net IDs are a quite new thing.
 

D.O.A.

These are great days we're living, bros
Our police/government let the providers save and store ID, timepoint and location of every mobile phone call/internet use for checking alibi and investigation reasons. It's for 4 until 10 weeks at the moment.
The mobile phone shit they're doing for years now, the net IDs are a quite new thing.
There is a foreign listening station in the outback here, pine gap, no ones really sure though if they chase chinese satellites or our phone calls but snowden has said it's a key NSA facility. Our government won't even talk about it, absolutely nothing.

 
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